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Jun 29th
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From the Editor

greg_archerS2sPlus Letters to Good Times...
Sounding Off About H1N1
Fire in ‘Flex’
HOLIDAY DEADLINES

Crime is on everybody’s mind lately, especially in Santa Cruz, which has seen a curious wave of short-lived criminal activity. But overall, is crime up—or down? It’s one of the things discussed in this week’s main news story. Here, writer Anna Merlan reports on a recent Santa Cruz City Council meeting where the issue of crime was the main agenda. Actually, it may have been more of a empowering session of healthy venting. Locals weighed in on their concerns and new actions were taken to increase crime watch locally.

On a much brighter note, there’s always music—it’s the subject of this week’s cover story. In what has to be one of the more inventive creations to come out of UC Santa Cruz—and there are many—Nick Veronin explores the mystique of Emily Howell. She’s not actually real—at least in the physical sense. Howell is the computer program designed by UCSC prof David Cope. The program actually creates music. Ponder that one.

Elsewhere, be sure to catch Lisa Jensen’s review of the new film Precious. It’s one of the most powerful and hypnotic films of the year. (I sat there afterwards wanting to experience more of the film’s truly original main character.) Find out more in this week’s film section (page 34).

What’s left? Well, Thanksgiving is fast approaching. I don’t know about you, but there’s nothing like some fine home-cooking to soothe the soul. And, really, after a year like 2009—and a decade like the one we’re emerging out of—it’s never too early to start giving thanks and reflecting. Preferably with a plate of full of food and something strong to toast with.

Cheers to that. More next time ..

Greg Archer
Editor

 


Sounding Off About H1N1
I was very disturbed by the letter (GT 11/12) by Randy Baker MD, persuading pregnant women not to receive the H1N1 vaccine. I have no idea where he got his information claiming that the “chance of a pregnant woman dying form swine flu is one in 4 million.” In addition, his referral to Russell Blaylock is concerning, considering that he makes his living as a quack creating fear about such things as vaccines. Overwhelming evidence suggests that vaccines save lives.
The potential benefits of taking the H1N1 vaccine for the mother (and her unborn fetus) as well as the risk of serious illness or death from H1N1, outweighs theoretical risks to the fetus. Studies continue to show that vaccines aren’t associated with autism.
Pregnant women who catch the virus in their second or third trimester, are more likely to suffer complications, like pneumonia and severe respiratory distress. On Oct. 1, the CDC reported that 100 pregnant women infected with H1N1 were hospitalized in intensive care units in the first four months of the outbreak, and that 28 had died.
An Oct. 2, Washington Post article by David Brown stated, “most previous influenza pandemics have also had what appeared to be unusually high death rates in pregnant women. In one series of 1,350 Spanish flu cases in pregnant women in 1918, 27 percent were fatal. In the Asian flu outbreak of 1957, half the women of reproductive age in Minnesota who died of the infection were pregnant.“
According to the CDC, “Pregnant women have had higher rates of hospitalization than the general population. About 6 percent of confirmed H1N1 2009 influenza deaths in the U.S. have been in pregnant women, while only about 1 percent of the general population is pregnant at any given time. One recent large case control study found that the seasonal flu shot given to pregnant women reduced flu illness in their infants under 6 months of age by 63 percent.”
I encourage pregnant women and others to talk with their own doctors. Don’t listen to Randy Baker or Russell Blaylock.
Susan Smith
Aptos

Fire in ‘Flex’
I wish I could afford one of those yoga retreats reported on last week. (GT “Flex, Pray, Love,” above) It doesn’t really matter. What an interesting story on a local gal [Ann Barros] trying to help other people by hosting yoga retreats in Bali. I never tire, nor am I surprised any more, of the great souls that nurture and love in this fine community.
Paige Thompson
Ben Lomond

HOLIDAY DEADLINES
GT offices will be closed Nov. 26-27 for the Thanksgiving Holiday. Take note of the following holiday deadlines, which will be in effect for the Wednesday, Nov. 25 issue:  Display, Class Display, Bulletin Board and Classified ads:  3 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 19. 

The following deadlines will be in effect for the Thursday, Dec. 3 issue: Display, Class Display and Bulletin Board: 3 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 25. Classified ads: 10 a.m., Monday, Nov 30. Calendar: noon Monday, Nov 23.
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I Was a Teenage Deadhead

Memories of life on tour, plus the truth about that legendary Santa Cruz Acid Test

 

I Build a Lighted House and Therein Dwell

Wednesday, June 24, Chiron turns stationary retrograde (we turn inward) at 21.33 degrees Pisces. We usually speak of “retrograde” when referring to Mercury. But all planets retrograde. Next month in July, Venus retrogrades. What is Chiron retrograde? Chiron represents the wound within all of us. Wounds have purpose. They sensitize us; make us aware of pain and suffering. Through our wounds we develop compassion. Through compassion we become whole (holy) again. Chiron helps develop these states of consciousness. Everyone carries a wound. Everyone carries family wounds (family astrology tracks the astrological “DNA” through generations). Chiron wounds are deep within. We’re often not aware of them until Chiron retrogrades. Then the wounds (through pain, hurt, sadness, suffering) become apparent. They seem to break us open emotionally, psychologically. Painful events from the past are remembered. They are brought to the present for healing. Through experiencing, talking about and deeply feeling what is hurting us, healing takes place. We begin to understand and bring healing to others. All week, Jupiter and Venus move closer together in the sky. They meet in Leo at the full moon, Cancer solar festival, on Wednesday, July 1. The Cancer keynote is, “I build a lighted house and therein dwell.” The soul’s light has finally penetrated the “womb” of matter. The New Group of World Servers is to radiate this light. At the end of each sign are keywords to use and remember during the Chiron retrograde.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of June 26

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
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Kickin' Chicken

Local kitchen alchemist Justin Williams is fast becoming a cult flavor master. His late-night wizardry, which began last fall delivering mainly to starving UCSC students, is catching on with taste buds beyond campus. Kickin’ Chicken delivers its spicy-sweet fried chicken and waffles to Westside residents between 9 p.m. and 2 a.m. nightly. Or you can catch him and his brother and sister, Candice and Danny Mendoza, serving it up at their “Sunday Mass” at the Santa Cruz Food Lounge at 1001 Center St. in Santa Cruz. Using sous vide, a French method of cooking chicken in a water bath at a tightly controlled temperature, they then flash fry it for an amazingly crispy coat. Candice Mendoza spoke to GT about Kickin’ Chicken’s rise.

 

What’s a creative new approach to addressing summer beach litter?

Robotic dogs, with duct tape on their paws, that walk around picking up litter wherever they go. Joaquin Heinz, Santa Cruz, Barista

 

Pelican Ranch Winery

The most popular red wines found on store shelves are also those most commonly known, such as Pinot, Zinfandel and Merlot. But when you come across a more unusual varietal, like Pelican Ranch Winery’s Cinsault ($19), it opens up a whole new world. Cinsault is a grape that can tolerate heat, so it is found in countries with warmer climes such as Morocco, Algeria, Lebanon, and France. It’s rare in California but grows well in places like Lodi—Silvaspoons Vineyard in this particular case—where it’s hot and dry. Often used as a blending grape, the silky Cinsault is just fine on its own.

 

Open Wide

Soif’s soft reboot leads to expanded menu, plus the ‘thinking woman’s ketchup’