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Mar 06th
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From the Editor

greg archerPlus Letters to the Editor

Summer officially arrives this week, which, for many of us, includes attending some our area’s finest events. Certainly, it’s hard to pass up any of this summer’s theater offerings.

Shakespeare Santa Cruz boasts an inviting season, especially with its world premiere of “The Man in the Iron Mask” (opening July 25). But there’s also “Twelfth Night” (July 24-Aug. 26) and “Henry IV, Part Two” (Aug. 7-26). The Fringe Show, “Mandrake” (Aug 21-22) also looks captivating. Visit shakespearesantacruz.org for more details. Over at Cabrillo Stage, things look festive. A big, bold production of “A Chorus Line” runs July 13-Aug. 12. “Anything Goes” sets sail July 27- Aug. 19 and the world premiere of “Escaping Queens” runs Aug. 10-19. See cabrillostage.com. Meanwhile, how can we pass up attending anything that has to do with the 50th Anniversary of the Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music? The celebrated outing runs July 28-Aug. 12. Learn more at cabrillomusic.org.

That’s plenty of creative drama to keep us busy in the coming months, but there’s also some news coming out of Big Sur that might interest locals, too. The Henry Miller Memorial Library is hosting a number of events that seem destined to draw interest, but the revered organization is also seeking funds for renovations. One event is in San Francisco on Monday, June 25; others take place at the library down south. Learn more about all that on page 29 and see how you can contribute or offer other support. One more event to consider unfolds Friday, June 22 at Capitola Book Café.Dubbed Local Authors Extravaganza, it begins at 6 p.m. with a champagne reception, where you can meet 16 local scribes. The authors speak at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are available online at capitolabookcafe.com, at the store, or on Facebook. Check it out. It’s a great way to support the store’s Survive & Thrive Campaign.

With half of 2012 nearly over, it’s fitting that writer Geoffrey Dunn takes us on a trip back in time—oh, how much more rewarding it was to talk face to face rather than, say, the texting habit found in our culture today. In his piece on artist Lillian Howard, Dunn finds himself pulled deeper into a mystery surrounding the “disappearance” of the one-time local. It’s the first in a number of historic pieces you’ll find in GT from Dunn in the coming months. Turn to page 12 and dive in. In the meantime, enjoy the new season ahead of you.

Thank you for reading.

Have an excellent week.

Greg Archer | Editor-in-Chief


 Letters to the Editor

Looking At All Sides
I moved here three years ago and continue to find this the most wonderful place in many ways. I came here from Charleston, S.C., where I grew up. I worked 20-plus years for the woman that raised Jesse Jackson. I know something about 'black' people, I think. And I know it is increasingly inappropriate to consider race when chasing riddles, but I think the biggest misperception common to Shannon Collins’ murder was that which linked him to the homeless community here, a community which I have been a part of since I got here because I recognize these people as family regardless of their hygeine and sanity, for I am myself homeless. What I think should enter public thinking is the observation that the man was a big misfit, unable to reconcile himself to any idea of how to find a comfortable existence among all of these dirty, scary white people (and he had made basically just such complaint for the record at some point as I read it). Someone in his place is as lost as someone in a nuthouse who considers that the only way out is through the window, no matter how high, and he felt like he was on the roof of the nuthouse. Carrying a Bible, come on. Who did not see this as an outcry for some sort of personal, spiritual attention.
Mike Roberts
Santa Cruz 


Online Comments

On ‘Burning Man’ ...
I thought the article was great, though I missed any mention of some of the more wide-reaching altruistic endeavors that the event fosters—Burners Without Borders, for example, which provides funds and volunteers for civic projects around the world.
—Guest

I'm a two-time burner from the midwest who hopes to return many times again in the future. It really is impossible to describe the experience to my "civilian" friends. Even if I try, I know that if they ever attend the event, their experience will likely be completely different from mine. Even with thorough preparation, your expectations (and your mind) will be blown.
—Anonymous

On ‘Students of the Recession’ ...
Access, affordability to University is farther and farther out of reach. University of California Berkeley Chancellor Robert J Birgeneau is outspoken on why elite public Cal. should ‘charge Californians much more.’ No. 1 ranked Harvard is now less costly (all in costs). Birgeneau’s ‘charge much more’ makes California the most expensive public university. Opinions? Email UC Board of Regents, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Or the California State Senators, assembly members.
—Anonymous

On ‘One Way or Two Way? ‘
I don't come Downtown too often because of the lack of pedestrian control crossing streets and holding up cars trying to get on and off Pacific. You could be stranded from going across a street for minutes and cars back up and can't go anywhere. The same thing is true for the pier and beach area. There is a need for a PED. light so they must stop so cars won't get congested. Also, I think it was a dumb thing to take away the three-way stop going to the pier/Boardwalk/walk. Cars coming down the side street at the Mexican food place can't turn left because cross traffic doesn't have to stop anymore.
—A.G.

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