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Jul 01st
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From the Editor

Greg 12Plus Letters To The EDITOR

There’s plenty to look forward to this fall for Santa Cruzans. For starters, we are blessed with having some of the best weather this time of year and so far, Mother Nature is shining good cheer down on us. Beyond that, school is back in session—both at Cabrillo College and UC Santa Cruz, and beyond. On that note, be on the watch for this year’s Dilated Pupil, GT’s annual student guide publication.

Thriving now for several years, this year you can expect a reboot on a number of levels—from the entire look of the publication to the content you will discover inside. Dilated Pupil will hit newsstands and kiosks within the coming week. (Is it just me, or does the idea of graduating in 2016 seem incredibly futuristic?)

Now, onto something truly eclectic—fashionART Santa Cruz, which hits the Civic once again on Saturday, Sept. 22. Fans of the popular event, which spotlights ‘fashion as art”—and vice versa—will appreciate writer Kim Luke’s cover story this week in which she shines the spotlight on two locals, Jill Alexander and Christina Morgan Cree. Alexander’s celebrity has been rising steadily over the years, thanks, in part, to her designs for plus-size comtemporary clothing for women. Meanwhile, Cree shows off her creative side and truly embodies one of the main tenets of fashionART Santa Cruz—creating wearable art and more. This year’s event promises to be as festive as ever. See you near the runway ...

Also in this week’s issue is a News story on desalination and how it could impact Santa Cruz. Last week, I noted Measure P, the Santa Cruz Desalination Measure, which is designed to make certain that the City of Santa Cruz does not “approve or fund a desalination project without voter approval.” It’s on the Nov. 6 ballot. In the meantime, look in the paper to learn more about the highly contentious local issue. And continue sending us your thoughts and feedback to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Enjoy the issue. Thanks for reading.

Have a stellar week ...

Greg Archer | Editor-in-Chief


Letters to the Editor

Vigil Provokes Thought
Regarding “Reaction to the Crackdown” and how the homeless and allies took the streets in a vigil, thank you, Santa Cruz Police Department for your hard work in identifying, citing and arresting those individuals involved in criminal activity, including stealing, illegal drug sales, pimping, etc. Such criminal behavior is the biggest threat to our innocent homeless population, as well as to our community at large. Keep up the good work, and don't let the turkeys (a small but vocal minority) get you down.
Ronald Hughes
Santa Cruz 


Online Comments

On Burning Man ...
The culture of Burning Man gives me hope for the future. It provides balance, kindness and creativity to what can be a selfish, brutal world. I am happy to see it growing and growing.
—Guest

On ‘Freddy Alnas’ ...
I enjoyed the story and relived life as a boy raised in the Salinas Valley of California in the 1940s. [With] my Filipino father and "white" mother from Oklahoma, I recall the difficulty of being accepted, at first, as an American. My dad was a field worker, an irrigator most of the local farmers wanted, as he was an artist in the fields. I'm proud to be an American, but have not forgotten my heritage. This was a very true story, and brought back many memories.
—John Sharp Sampaga
Lemmon Valley, Nevada

Your story about Mr. Alnas brought tears to my eyes; not just a few, but a steady flow as I read each word, viewed each picture. Words which brought back memories of what I knew and suspected of my own father's journey during and after WWII. Pictures I treasure of my dad during the War, and afterwards, when he met my mom. Your story of Mr. Alnas’ journey has brought back many bitter sweet memories, and I thank you for that. — t jacinto-foster I'm moved to tears as I finish this excerpt. Written with such heart and determination to tell the whole story, Freddie, someone I never knew, comes alive and becomes important to me and the town I live in. I understand so much more now. This is historical writing at its finest. So rich, so focused, so intent on telling a story that others either don't know or care about. Thank you Geoffrey Dunn.
—Nora Hochman

On ‘Reaction To The Crackdown’ ...
All you haters should hang your heads in shame. This policy might give you a cathartic sense of stickin' it to those bums, but in reality, where the rest of us live, it doesn't [do] anything to fix the systemic problem of mass unemployment. The money that was spent on these raids could have been spent on helping people acquire housing and jobs.
—Collin Clyde

Thank you SCPD and Parks and Recreation department. It will be nice to visit city parks without having to worry about being accosted by homeless people looking for handouts or having to put up with their trash.
—Donny B

On ‘Art And Democracy’ ...
I find Andrew's comments about art, art in public, the nuances of art, and art as a valid response/participation to be incredibly inspiring and challenging. Today, I will own my Self-as-Artist and commit to a creative process. Thank you, Andrew!
—Eileen Cavalier 

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I Was a Teenage Deadhead

Memories of life on tour, plus the truth about that legendary Santa Cruz Acid Test

 

I Build a Lighted House and Therein Dwell

Wednesday, June 24, Chiron turns stationary retrograde (we turn inward) at 21.33 degrees Pisces. We usually speak of “retrograde” when referring to Mercury. But all planets retrograde. Next month in July, Venus retrogrades. What is Chiron retrograde? Chiron represents the wound within all of us. Wounds have purpose. They sensitize us; make us aware of pain and suffering. Through our wounds we develop compassion. Through compassion we become whole (holy) again. Chiron helps develop these states of consciousness. Everyone carries a wound. Everyone carries family wounds (family astrology tracks the astrological “DNA” through generations). Chiron wounds are deep within. We’re often not aware of them until Chiron retrogrades. Then the wounds (through pain, hurt, sadness, suffering) become apparent. They seem to break us open emotionally, psychologically. Painful events from the past are remembered. They are brought to the present for healing. Through experiencing, talking about and deeply feeling what is hurting us, healing takes place. We begin to understand and bring healing to others. All week, Jupiter and Venus move closer together in the sky. They meet in Leo at the full moon, Cancer solar festival, on Wednesday, July 1. The Cancer keynote is, “I build a lighted house and therein dwell.” The soul’s light has finally penetrated the “womb” of matter. The New Group of World Servers is to radiate this light. At the end of each sign are keywords to use and remember during the Chiron retrograde.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of June 26

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
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Kickin' Chicken

Local kitchen alchemist Justin Williams is fast becoming a cult flavor master. His late-night wizardry, which began last fall delivering mainly to starving UCSC students, is catching on with taste buds beyond campus. Kickin’ Chicken delivers its spicy-sweet fried chicken and waffles to Westside residents between 9 p.m. and 2 a.m. nightly. Or you can catch him and his brother and sister, Candice and Danny Mendoza, serving it up at their “Sunday Mass” at the Santa Cruz Food Lounge at 1001 Center St. in Santa Cruz. Using sous vide, a French method of cooking chicken in a water bath at a tightly controlled temperature, they then flash fry it for an amazingly crispy coat. Candice Mendoza spoke to GT about Kickin’ Chicken’s rise.

 

What’s a creative new approach to addressing summer beach litter?

Robotic dogs, with duct tape on their paws, that walk around picking up litter wherever they go. Joaquin Heinz, Santa Cruz, Barista

 

Pelican Ranch Winery

The most popular red wines found on store shelves are also those most commonly known, such as Pinot, Zinfandel and Merlot. But when you come across a more unusual varietal, like Pelican Ranch Winery’s Cinsault ($19), it opens up a whole new world. Cinsault is a grape that can tolerate heat, so it is found in countries with warmer climes such as Morocco, Algeria, Lebanon, and France. It’s rare in California but grows well in places like Lodi—Silvaspoons Vineyard in this particular case—where it’s hot and dry. Often used as a blending grape, the silky Cinsault is just fine on its own.

 

Open Wide

Soif’s soft reboot leads to expanded menu, plus the ‘thinking woman’s ketchup’