Santa Cruz Good Times

Oct 07th
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From The Editor

Greg 12Locals and surf enthusiasts are familiar with the name Jay Moriarity. He was the dynamic local surfer whose celebrity soared after tackling Mavericks, the notorious surfing spot up the coast. The surf pro met an early fate at 22 years of age in 2001, but his legacy, especially here in Santa Cruz, lives on.


Moriarity is also the subject of the new film Chasing Mavericks, which will be released later this month and headlined by A-list celeb Gerard Butler morphing into Moriarity’s mentor Richard “Frosty” Hesson. Of course, for those rooted here, Frosty is no stranger. His soulful way of being, not to mention his inspiring insights, have made the man a legend in his own right, which is what writer Geoffrey Dunn illuminates in this week’s cover story. Learn more about the man who inspired Moriarity, the upcoming film and much more.

Speaking of locals, Good Times welcomes one back—in a major way. We welcome publisher Jeff Mitchell, who has been an active force in the media industry for some time. After a successful run as a Santa Cruz Sentinel advertising executive, he later joined GT’s parent company, Mainstreet Media, and comes off of a nice run as publisher of Poway News Chieftan, Rancho Bernardo News Journal and the Ramona Sentinel, three community newspapers in the San Diego area. Here’s to all new ventures ahead as we continue to delve deeper into the modern media world. (Learn more about Jeff in next week’s GT.)

In the meantime, be sure to take note of one of the county’s biggest, brightest and boldest creative endeavors—Open Studios. The celebrated artistic cultural event begins the first of its three-weekend run on Oct. 6 and 7. Click here for the full rundown—and be sure to check out GT next week for further updates.

What’s left? Good times. Have some this week. More next time ...

Greg Archer | Editor-in-Chief

Letters to the Editor

Are Politicians the True Leaders?
In response to “Just Wondering’s” comment on Desal, the problem with letting “leaders” make the important decisions is the leaders are politicians. By definition their choices will be political ones; not decisions that are based on facts, science, sound economics and what  is good for most people.

Point in fact: 30 years ago politicians made a political decision against building the Zayante Dam. We would have abundant cheap water now if those so-called leaders had made a smart decision then instead of a political one. Now we have new politicians and this time the smart voters don’t want politicians deciding such a critical issue as a desal plant.

Maybe the smart desal decision this time is the one that should have been made long ago. Build the Zayante Dam with an electric generation component. And before the dam is filled; log the back bay and sell the timber to defray the cost. Give me smart, sentient voters over a politician every time.
Stuart Howell
Santa Cruz

The FLOWdown    
Regarding the upcoming election, while FLOW (Friends of Locally Owned Water) was working to purchase Felton’s water system from a foreign multinational, I stopped in Bruce McPherson’s Sacramento office. I was told by his chief aide that Mr. McPherson would—unequivocally—not meet with or help us. If he wouldn’t meet with a large, local group on something so critically needing his state-level help, why would we expect his attention now?

The 5th District Supervisor race provides a very clear choice: old guard power structure vs. fresh, local, hard work.

I’m truly excited to support Eric Hammer for Supervisor. I’ve known him for years: he’s come up through the grassroots, really listens, rolls up his sleeves and works harder than anyone I know for our kids, our environment, our economy. At every forum, his understanding of what’s actually happening locally and how to create real, positive change ran circles around his opponents.
Barbara Sprenger
Santa Cruz

Online Comments
On ‘The Vets Hall Reopening’ ...  
These are established facts. 1) The Veterans Memorial Building was shut down in five hours when only modest repairs could have kept the building open safely for years without long-term disruption of veterans affairs. (Refer to UVC SCC trial civil engineering testimony.) 2) The county is short of cash yet promoting millions to be spent for a huge and unnecessary renovation instead of quick necessary lower-cost effective repairs of slaking concrete columns and piers and a new boiler.
—An insider's Knowledge

On ‘Desalination and You’ ...
How healthy is it to drink de-salinated water? It is not natural. I drank some bottled de-salinated water once (apparently there is a brand that makes this). I remember drinking it and still feeling thirsty and something just didn't seem right. I immediately went to get some fresh water to drink. Why don't we focus more on re-using graywater for golf courses, etc. But please—not drink. See some info on Risks. I wouldn't even give this water to my dog to drink.

The article “Blown Away” in last week’s Fall Home & Garden cover story erroneously stated that the California Landscape Contractors Association did not publish Ken Foster’s letter about reducing leaf blower usage. The CLCA did, in fact, run an article about Foster’s letter in April of this year. We regret the error.

Comments (2)Add Comment
written by AidesRUs, October 04, 2012
Further, that particular FLOW initiative was not within the purview of the Secretary of State's office. McP does not have any record of being aware of, or having any contact with, a low level operative called Barbara Sprenger. Even ardent googling precludes any suggestion that Sprenger speaks the truth.

We think this is a silly letter by a campaign coordinator (Barbara Sprenger) of an extremely flawed candidate (Eric Hammer). But, we do agree with that part about he runs around in circles.
written by AidesRUs, October 04, 2012
FLOW who? Barbara who? At the last Aide Re it was clear we had no recollection of a Barbara Sprenger stopping by the office demanding support for an astroturf action to control a water company. Not once, not ever.

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A Ritual & Initiation

The Pope has come and gone, but his loving presence ignited new hope and goodness in many. While he was in NYC, China’s ruler arrived in Washington D.C. East (China) and West (Rome), meeting in the middle, under Libra, balancing sign of Right Relations. The Pope arrived at Fall Equinox. Things initiated at Fall Equinox are birthed at Winter Solstice. The Pope’s presence was a ritual, an initiation rite—like the Dalai Lama’s visits—offering prayers, teachings and blessings. Rituals anchor God’s plan into the world, initiating us to new realities, new rules. The Pope’s presence brings forth the Soul of the United States, its light piercing the veils of materialism. The Pope’s visit changed things. New questions arise, new reasons for living. A new wave of emerging life fills the air. Like a cocoon shifting, wings becoming visible. The winds are different now. Calling us to higher vision, moral values, virtues that reaffirm and offer hope for humanity. A changing of the guard has occurred. Appropriately, this is the week of the Jewish Festival of Sukkoth (’til Oct. 4), when we build temporary homes (little huts in nature), entering into a harvest of prayer and thanksgiving, understanding our fragile and impermanent existences. We are summoned to reflect upon our lives, our humanity, our nature, our spirit and each other. Offering gratitude, becoming a magnet for others. We observe. We see the needs. We love more.
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