Santa Cruz Good Times

Saturday
Nov 22nd
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

From the Editor

Plus Letters To The Editor Greg 12

So ... what are you doing on Tuesday, Nov. 6? Something vital and important, we hope. It’s Election Day, after all, so in case you need another reminder that your voice, your vote, your vigilance matters, study this week’s issue intently. In our biggest Election Guide to date
, News Editor Elizabeth Limbach and other GT scribes shed light on the local issues on this year’s ballot.

Aside from what looks to be a critical Santa Cruz City Council race, the proposition generating significant buzz is Prop. 37, which, if passed, would mandate the labelling of genetically modified food (GMOs) in California. But take note of some of the measures that are presented before us this year, too. Pay attention to Measure P. Spearheaded by the folks at Right to Vote on Desal Coalition, it attempts to offer more strict guidelines on the desal issue in that it places a bona fide city charter amendment before voters. If passed, the amendment would actually become part of the City Charter. What does that mean? That Santa Cruz City Council could not change it without voter approval.

There’s more, so take some time after the Halloween holiday this week and learn more about each and every measure and proposition, and what’s at stake—for you, your family, your community.

When Downtown Santa Cruz brushes the creative dust off of itself after its annual behemoth Halloween spectacle, it might be time to indulge in some of the local restaurants offering unique presentations and meals this fall. For that, you can pick up our Fall Food & Wine issue, in which we spotlight a variety of unique culinary souls worthy of our attention. (See insert.)

In the meantime, it’s First Friday time again, so consider supporting our area’s local artists and art galleries this week. (See page 35.)

What’s left? Enough to keep you busy through Election Day, no doubt. But, in a contentious political year that seemed to whiz by us, take a moment to consider which candidates would best serve your community—and the country. Thanks for reading. More soon ... Greg Archer | Editor-in-Chief


Letters to the Editor 

Remembering McGovern
A few weeks ago, we lost former U.S. Sen. George McGovern. Although many will recall his disastrous 1972 loss to Richard Nixon and his subsequent leadership in getting us out of Vietnam, his truly lasting legacy will be his war on hunger and malnutrition.

In 1977, following extensive public hearings, McGovern’s Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs published Dietary Goals for the United States, a precursor to today’s Dietary Guidelines. It marked the first time that a U.S. government document recommended reduced meat consumption.

The meat industry forced the Committee to destroy all copies of the report and to remove the offending recommendation from a new edition. It then abolished the Committee, voted McGovern out of office, and warned government bureaucrats never to challenge meat consumption again. (Food Politics by Marion Nestle, 2007).

Yet, after 35 years of studies linking meat consumption with elevated risk of heart disease, stroke, cancer, and other killer diseases, the MyPlate icon, representing USDA’s current Dietary Guidelines for Americans, recommends vegetables, fruits, and grains, but never mentions meat, and shunts dairy off to one side. (choosemyplate.gov/).

And it all started with one brave senator from South Dakota.
Solomon Levine
Santa Cruz


Online Comments

On ‘Prop 32’
Political contributions are "voluntary" much in the same way Prop. 32 is broad campaign finance reform. They make it so cumbersome and unadvertised that hardly anyone opts out. A letter has to be sent every year opting out; there is no permanent method. And I have to use my supplies and my stamp to get out of contributing to their causes. In spite of its flaws, I am voting yes on 32.
—MOP

On James Clark/‘Shots of War’ ...
I served with James—a.k.a. "snaps"—in Marjah and Kajaki. He always had a smile on his face and a good outlook on every situation. He is brave, smart and a damn good Marine. It’s nice to see that he’s getting the recognition he deserves in his community and this great country. Good job, brother.
—Mathew Black

My grandson, Matt Flory is a Marine. I have the greatest respect for him and what he is doing. I think war is stupid and a waste of time, money and, most important, lives, but I am afraid we will never see a time without it. Richard Flory Super great article. It has informed me more deeply about the war and its effect on our men and women who serve over there and the citizens who live everday with war than any other peace. Powerful and insightful. Thank god for great humans such as James Clark.
—Peggy Herring

On ‘180/180’ ...
There are desperate, ill and about-to-be- homeless people on the voucher list. In the words of Ken Cole, director of Santa Cruz Housing Authority, some have died waiting their turn. I think it would be fair and equitable for the 180/180 project to ask the permission of those who are about to be bumped from the list. An incentive could be offered to make this happen. Otherwise, I foresee a lawsuit for discrimination.
—Don Honda

On ‘Frosty’ / Chasing Mavericks ...
There is something about spending time outdoors, especially floating on a board in the ocean, that allows you to have long deep thoughts and fit the pieces of life together.
—Doug Gawoski


Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Pop Life

The pop-up dining trend is freeing culinary imaginations and creating a guerilla version of event dining around Santa Cruz

 

Over Hills and Plains, Riding a White Horse, Bow and Arrows in Hand

Saturday, early morning, the sun enters and radiates the light of Sagittarius. Three hours later, the Sagittarius new moon (0.07 degrees) occurs. “Let food be sought,” is the personality-building keynote. “Food” means experiences; all kinds, levels and types. It also means real food. Sag’s secret is their love of food. Many, if not musicians, are chefs. Some are both. The energies shift from Scorpio’s deep and transformative waters to the “hills and plains of Sagittarius.” Sag is the rider on a white horse, eyes focused on the mountain peaks of Capricorn (Initiation) ahead. Like Scorpio, Sagittarius is also the “disciple.” Adventure, luck, optimism, joy and the beginnings of gratitude are the hallmarks of Sagittarius. Sag is also one of the signs of silence. The battle lines were drawn in Libra and we were asked to choose where we stood. The Nine Tests were given in Scorpio and we emerged “warriors triumphant.” Now in Sag, we are to be the One-Pointed Disciple, riding over the plains on a white horse, bow and arrows in hand, eyes focused on the Path of Return ahead. Sagittarians are one-pointed (symbol of the arrow). Sag asks, “What is my life’s purpose?” This is their quest, from valleys, plains, meadows and hills, eyes aimed always at the mountaintop. Sag emerges from Scorpio’s deep waters, conflict and tests into the open air. Sag’s quest is humanity’s quest. Sag’s quest, however, is always accompanied by music and good food.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of November 21

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Pie Fidelity

A little Thanksgiving help, plus sip and shop locally at the Art, Wine and Gift Bazaar

 

What should be on everyone’s bucket list?

Hang gliding, because you're free as a bird. Jenni, Santa Cruz, Student/Administrative Assistant

 

Soquel Vineyards

Thanksgiving is just around the corner, so it’s time to be thinking about the wine you’re going to serve with that special dinner, be it turkey, ham, a roast, or something vegetarian or vegan.

 

The Kitchen

Chef Santos Majano talks beer-friendly food at Discretion Brewery