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Apr 25th
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From the Editor

Plus Letters To The Editor Greg 12

So ... what are you doing on Tuesday, Nov. 6? Something vital and important, we hope. It’s Election Day, after all, so in case you need another reminder that your voice, your vote, your vigilance matters, study this week’s issue intently. In our biggest Election Guide to date
, News Editor Elizabeth Limbach and other GT scribes shed light on the local issues on this year’s ballot.

Aside from what looks to be a critical Santa Cruz City Council race, the proposition generating significant buzz is Prop. 37, which, if passed, would mandate the labelling of genetically modified food (GMOs) in California. But take note of some of the measures that are presented before us this year, too. Pay attention to Measure P. Spearheaded by the folks at Right to Vote on Desal Coalition, it attempts to offer more strict guidelines on the desal issue in that it places a bona fide city charter amendment before voters. If passed, the amendment would actually become part of the City Charter. What does that mean? That Santa Cruz City Council could not change it without voter approval.

There’s more, so take some time after the Halloween holiday this week and learn more about each and every measure and proposition, and what’s at stake—for you, your family, your community.

When Downtown Santa Cruz brushes the creative dust off of itself after its annual behemoth Halloween spectacle, it might be time to indulge in some of the local restaurants offering unique presentations and meals this fall. For that, you can pick up our Fall Food & Wine issue, in which we spotlight a variety of unique culinary souls worthy of our attention. (See insert.)

In the meantime, it’s First Friday time again, so consider supporting our area’s local artists and art galleries this week. (See page 35.)

What’s left? Enough to keep you busy through Election Day, no doubt. But, in a contentious political year that seemed to whiz by us, take a moment to consider which candidates would best serve your community—and the country. Thanks for reading. More soon ... Greg Archer | Editor-in-Chief


Letters to the Editor 

Remembering McGovern
A few weeks ago, we lost former U.S. Sen. George McGovern. Although many will recall his disastrous 1972 loss to Richard Nixon and his subsequent leadership in getting us out of Vietnam, his truly lasting legacy will be his war on hunger and malnutrition.

In 1977, following extensive public hearings, McGovern’s Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs published Dietary Goals for the United States, a precursor to today’s Dietary Guidelines. It marked the first time that a U.S. government document recommended reduced meat consumption.

The meat industry forced the Committee to destroy all copies of the report and to remove the offending recommendation from a new edition. It then abolished the Committee, voted McGovern out of office, and warned government bureaucrats never to challenge meat consumption again. (Food Politics by Marion Nestle, 2007).

Yet, after 35 years of studies linking meat consumption with elevated risk of heart disease, stroke, cancer, and other killer diseases, the MyPlate icon, representing USDA’s current Dietary Guidelines for Americans, recommends vegetables, fruits, and grains, but never mentions meat, and shunts dairy off to one side. (choosemyplate.gov/).

And it all started with one brave senator from South Dakota.
Solomon Levine
Santa Cruz


Online Comments

On ‘Prop 32’
Political contributions are "voluntary" much in the same way Prop. 32 is broad campaign finance reform. They make it so cumbersome and unadvertised that hardly anyone opts out. A letter has to be sent every year opting out; there is no permanent method. And I have to use my supplies and my stamp to get out of contributing to their causes. In spite of its flaws, I am voting yes on 32.
—MOP

On James Clark/‘Shots of War’ ...
I served with James—a.k.a. "snaps"—in Marjah and Kajaki. He always had a smile on his face and a good outlook on every situation. He is brave, smart and a damn good Marine. It’s nice to see that he’s getting the recognition he deserves in his community and this great country. Good job, brother.
—Mathew Black

My grandson, Matt Flory is a Marine. I have the greatest respect for him and what he is doing. I think war is stupid and a waste of time, money and, most important, lives, but I am afraid we will never see a time without it. Richard Flory Super great article. It has informed me more deeply about the war and its effect on our men and women who serve over there and the citizens who live everday with war than any other peace. Powerful and insightful. Thank god for great humans such as James Clark.
—Peggy Herring

On ‘180/180’ ...
There are desperate, ill and about-to-be- homeless people on the voucher list. In the words of Ken Cole, director of Santa Cruz Housing Authority, some have died waiting their turn. I think it would be fair and equitable for the 180/180 project to ask the permission of those who are about to be bumped from the list. An incentive could be offered to make this happen. Otherwise, I foresee a lawsuit for discrimination.
—Don Honda

On ‘Frosty’ / Chasing Mavericks ...
There is something about spending time outdoors, especially floating on a board in the ocean, that allows you to have long deep thoughts and fit the pieces of life together.
—Doug Gawoski


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Every April 22, humanity celebrates International Mother Earth Day and Earth Day. As more than a billion people participate in Earth Day activities every year, Earth Day has become the world’s largest civic observance. The massive concern to build right relations between humanity and the living being we call Earth is evidence of humanity’s love of the Mother. In 2009, the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed April 22 International Mother Earth Day, with a significant resolution affirming “the interdependence existing among human beings, other living species (the kingdoms—mineral, plant, animal and human) and the planet itself, the Earth which we all inhabit.” The Earth is our home. Celebrating Earth Day helps us define new emerging processes (economic, social, political) focused on the well-being of the kingdoms. Through these, humanity seeks to raise the quality of life, foster equality and begin to establish right relations with the Earth. We dedicate ourselves to bringing forth balance and a relationship of harmony with all of nature. Learn about planting a billion trees (the Canopy Project); participate in 1.5 billion acts of green. Disassociation (toward Earth) is no longer viable. We lose our connection to life itself. Participation is viable—an anchor, refuge and service for all of life on Earth. Visit earthday.org; harmonywithnatureun.org; and un.org/en/events/motherearthday for more information. From Farmers Almanac, “On Earth Day, enjoy the tonic of fresh air, contact with the soil, companionship with nature! Go barefooted. Walk through woods, find wildflowers and green moss. Remain outside, no matter the weather!” Nature, Earth’s most balanced kingdom, heals us. The New Group of World Servers is preparing for the May 3 Wesak Buddha Taurus solar festival. We prepare through asking for and offering forgiveness. Forgiveness purifies and like nature, heals.

 

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