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Aug 31st
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From the Editor

greg_archerS2sPlus Letters to Good Times
High Times
Making the Most of the Coast
Spending Locally
Holiday Deadlines

So long 2009, hello 2010—and a new decade, too. If you haven’t already been waxing philosophical as the year and the decade draw to a close, the time is certainly ripe for it now. In this issue, we take a look back over the last 10 years and pluck out (only) 10 things that stood out and deserved mention. There’s so much more, of course, so send us your thoughts ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) on the issues that held us captivated during 2000-2009 and we’ll print some of your insights. But be sure click to this week's cover story and look at the local standouts.

As 2010 nears, so too does quite a bit of celebrating. What would New Year’s Eve be without that, whether you’re having a quiet yet festive gathering at home or going out on the town? For the latter, dive into the Music and Events pages this week for some highlights on what to do locally.

In the meantime, it won’t hurt to take some time for yourself in the coming week to reflect back on what the last 10 years have taught you, and, maybe, what great intentions you have for the next decade. Imagine that—where do you want to be in 2020?

Truthfully, all we have is “now,” so without sounding overly esoteric, I would be remiss if I didn’t even suggest that to “live in the moment” may be the best medicine you can give yourself in the coming year. As I’ve looked back over the last 10 years, and some of the stories we have covered here at GT, I have found that the most captivating cover topics seemed to be about people who followed their bliss, did the unconventional and lived in the here and now. It’s not a bad thing to aspire to, actually. So, here’s to 2010 and all the great opportunities ahead. And here’s to you, the readers, who keep us here and thriving. We couldn’t do this without you.

Happy New Year.

Greg Archer
Editor


Letters to Good Times Editor

High Times
A dangerously misleading quote from community studies professor Julie Guthman in "Sugar Shock" (GT 12/17) deserves clarification.  Guthman's statement that "... for adults, overweight is actually protective. It doesn't put you at increased risk for anything." That is an outdated misunderstanding which has been widely criticized by eminent nutrition professionals such as Walter Willett, MD, MPH, DrPH, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health. Guthman overlooks the reality that behavior related factors such as cigarette smoking and alcoholism, as well as a variety of chronic diseases such as cancer, may ultimately have the effect of reducing body mass.  A reduction in body mass caused by factors that may ultimately cause an earlier death does not mean that the lower body mass is the cause of the earlier death. Data analysis from a multitude of epidemiological studies shows that when the data is corrected for behaviors such as cigarette smoking and chronic diseases that tend to reduce weight, any apparent protective advantage from overweight disappears.
Also, mortality studies don't tell the whole story about whether overweight puts you at "increased risk for anything." Even when overweight doesn't reduce lifespan, it certainly increases the risk of spending a greater proportion of the later years on being sick, undergoing medical procedures, and suffering drug side effects and loss of independence.
Ed Lomasney
Scotts Valley


Making the Most of the Coast
Regarding the Slow Coast story (GT 12/22), so let me get this straight: If you're a hippy-dippy organic you are OK for the coast but if you're just a regular person, you're not wanted. Sorry, but I think that is bull pucky. What makes the organic hippy-dippy's better than regular folks? Nothing is the answer. Thats right, nothing. Wearing hemp clothing and espousing peace doesn't make one a better person, no matter what. Nor does it entitle you to property that regular folks can't get, or build where and what regular folks can't. Regular people can maybe build a house, but no more,  as building on the coast is evil. But organic hippy-dippys can build barns and what not. Huh? Ridiculous.
Paul Reese
Santa Cruz

Spending Locally
Kudos to columnist Tom Honig and his latest column (GT 12/17), which talked about spending locally. If there’s anything that the last year has taught me, it’s that I better damn well spend my dollars in this county. Who knows when things will improve financially.
Sarah Jones
Capitola

Holiday Deadlines
GOOD TIMES offices will be closed Wednesday, Dec. 23 through Friday, Jan 1 in observance of Christmas and New Year’s.

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The Meaning of ‘LIFE’

With a new documentary film about his work, and huge exhibits on both coasts, acclaimed Santa Cruz nature photographer Frans Lanting is having a landmark year. But his crusade for conservation doesn’t leave much time for looking back

 

Seasons of Opportunity

Everything in our world has a specific time (a season) in which to accomplish a specific work—a “season” that begins (opportunity) and ends (time’s up). I can feel the season is changing. The leaves turning colors, the air cooler, sunbeams casting shadows in different places. It feels like a seasonal change has begun in the northern hemisphere. Christmas is in four months, and 2015 is swiftly speeding by. Soon it will be autumn and time for the many Festivals of Light. Each season offers new opportunities. Then the season ends and new seasons take its place. Humanity, too, is given “seasons” of opportunity. We are in one of those opportunities now, to bring something new (Uranus) into our world, especially in the United States. Times of opportunity can be seen in the astrology chart. In the U.S. chart, Uranus (change) joins Chiron (wound/healing). This symbolizes a need to heal the wounds of humanity. Uranus offers new archetypes, new ways of doing things. The Uranus/Chiron (Aries/Pisces) message is, “The people of the U.S. are suffering. New actions are needed to bring healing and well-being to humanity. So the U.S. can fulfill its spiritual task of standing within the light and leading humanity within and toward the light.” Thursday, Aquarius Moon, Mercury enters Libra. The message, “To bring forth the new order in the world, begin with acts of Goodwill.” Goodwill produces right relations with everyone and everything. The result is a world of progressive well-being and peacefulness (which is neither passive nor the opposite of war). Saturday is the full moon, the solar light of Virgo streaming into the Earth. Our waiting now begins, for the birth of new light at winter solstice. The mother (hiding the light of the soul, the holy child), identifying the feminine principle, says, “I am the mother and the child. I, God (Father), I Matter (Mother), We are One.”

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of August 28

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
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Land of Plenty

Farm to Fork benefit dinner for UCSC’s Agroecology Center, plus a zippy salsa from Teresa’s Salsa that loves every food it meets

 

If you knew you had one week to live, what would you do?

Make peace with myself, which would allow me to be at peace with others. Diane Fisher, Santa Cruz, Network Engineer

 

Comanche Cellars

Michael Simons, owner and winemaker of Comanche Cellars, once had a trusted steed called Comanche, which was part of his paper route and his rodeo circuit, from the tender age of 10. In memory of this beautiful horse, he named his winery Comanche, and Comanche’s shoes grace the label of each handcrafted bottle.

 

Cantine Winepub

Aptos wine and tapas spot keeps it casual