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Dec 19th
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From the Editor

greg_archerS2sPlus Letters to Good Times
High Times
Making the Most of the Coast
Spending Locally
Holiday Deadlines

So long 2009, hello 2010—and a new decade, too. If you haven’t already been waxing philosophical as the year and the decade draw to a close, the time is certainly ripe for it now. In this issue, we take a look back over the last 10 years and pluck out (only) 10 things that stood out and deserved mention. There’s so much more, of course, so send us your thoughts ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) on the issues that held us captivated during 2000-2009 and we’ll print some of your insights. But be sure click to this week's cover story and look at the local standouts.

As 2010 nears, so too does quite a bit of celebrating. What would New Year’s Eve be without that, whether you’re having a quiet yet festive gathering at home or going out on the town? For the latter, dive into the Music and Events pages this week for some highlights on what to do locally.

In the meantime, it won’t hurt to take some time for yourself in the coming week to reflect back on what the last 10 years have taught you, and, maybe, what great intentions you have for the next decade. Imagine that—where do you want to be in 2020?

Truthfully, all we have is “now,” so without sounding overly esoteric, I would be remiss if I didn’t even suggest that to “live in the moment” may be the best medicine you can give yourself in the coming year. As I’ve looked back over the last 10 years, and some of the stories we have covered here at GT, I have found that the most captivating cover topics seemed to be about people who followed their bliss, did the unconventional and lived in the here and now. It’s not a bad thing to aspire to, actually. So, here’s to 2010 and all the great opportunities ahead. And here’s to you, the readers, who keep us here and thriving. We couldn’t do this without you.

Happy New Year.

Greg Archer
Editor


Letters to Good Times Editor

High Times
A dangerously misleading quote from community studies professor Julie Guthman in "Sugar Shock" (GT 12/17) deserves clarification.  Guthman's statement that "... for adults, overweight is actually protective. It doesn't put you at increased risk for anything." That is an outdated misunderstanding which has been widely criticized by eminent nutrition professionals such as Walter Willett, MD, MPH, DrPH, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health. Guthman overlooks the reality that behavior related factors such as cigarette smoking and alcoholism, as well as a variety of chronic diseases such as cancer, may ultimately have the effect of reducing body mass.  A reduction in body mass caused by factors that may ultimately cause an earlier death does not mean that the lower body mass is the cause of the earlier death. Data analysis from a multitude of epidemiological studies shows that when the data is corrected for behaviors such as cigarette smoking and chronic diseases that tend to reduce weight, any apparent protective advantage from overweight disappears.
Also, mortality studies don't tell the whole story about whether overweight puts you at "increased risk for anything." Even when overweight doesn't reduce lifespan, it certainly increases the risk of spending a greater proportion of the later years on being sick, undergoing medical procedures, and suffering drug side effects and loss of independence.
Ed Lomasney
Scotts Valley


Making the Most of the Coast
Regarding the Slow Coast story (GT 12/22), so let me get this straight: If you're a hippy-dippy organic you are OK for the coast but if you're just a regular person, you're not wanted. Sorry, but I think that is bull pucky. What makes the organic hippy-dippy's better than regular folks? Nothing is the answer. Thats right, nothing. Wearing hemp clothing and espousing peace doesn't make one a better person, no matter what. Nor does it entitle you to property that regular folks can't get, or build where and what regular folks can't. Regular people can maybe build a house, but no more,  as building on the coast is evil. But organic hippy-dippys can build barns and what not. Huh? Ridiculous.
Paul Reese
Santa Cruz

Spending Locally
Kudos to columnist Tom Honig and his latest column (GT 12/17), which talked about spending locally. If there’s anything that the last year has taught me, it’s that I better damn well spend my dollars in this county. Who knows when things will improve financially.
Sarah Jones
Capitola

Holiday Deadlines
GOOD TIMES offices will be closed Wednesday, Dec. 23 through Friday, Jan 1 in observance of Christmas and New Year’s.

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Giving and Giving, Then Giving Some More

2014 is almost over. Wednesday, Dec. 17, the Jewish Festival of Light, Hanukkah, begins. We are in our last week of Sag and last two weeks of December. Sunday, Dec. 21 is winter Solstice, as the sun enters Capricorn (3:30 p.m. for the west coast). Soon after, the Capricorn new moon occurs (5:36 p.m. for the west coast)—the last new moon of 2014. Sunday morning Uranus in Aries (revolution, revelation) is stationary direct (retro since July 22). Uranus/Aries create things new and needed to anchor the new culture and civilization (Aquarius). We will see revolutionary change in 2015. Capricorn new moon, building-the-personality seed thought, is, “Let ambition rule and let the door to initiation and freedom stand wide (open).” Capricorn is a gate—where matter returns to spirit. But the gate is unseen until the Ajna Center (third eye), Diamond Light of Direction, opens. Winter solstice is the longest day of darkness of the year. The sun’s rays resting at the Tropic of Capricorn (southern hemisphere) symbolize the Christ (soul’s) light piercing the heart of the Earth, remaining there for three days, till Holy Night (midnight Thursday morning). Then the sun’s light begins to rise. It is the birth of the new light (holy child) for the world. A deep calm and stillness pervades the world.The entire planet is revivified, re-spiritualized. All hearts beating reflect this Light. And so throughout the Earth there’s a radiant “impress” (impressions, pictures) given to humanity of the World Mother and her Child. The star Sirius (love/direction) and the constellation Virgo the mother shines above. For gift giving, give to those in need. Give and give and then give some more. This creates the new template of giving and sharing for the new world.

 

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