Santa Cruz Good Times

Friday
Apr 18th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

From the Editor

greg_archerS2sPlus Letters to Good Times
High Times
Making the Most of the Coast
Spending Locally
Holiday Deadlines

So long 2009, hello 2010—and a new decade, too. If you haven’t already been waxing philosophical as the year and the decade draw to a close, the time is certainly ripe for it now. In this issue, we take a look back over the last 10 years and pluck out (only) 10 things that stood out and deserved mention. There’s so much more, of course, so send us your thoughts ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) on the issues that held us captivated during 2000-2009 and we’ll print some of your insights. But be sure click to this week's cover story and look at the local standouts.

As 2010 nears, so too does quite a bit of celebrating. What would New Year’s Eve be without that, whether you’re having a quiet yet festive gathering at home or going out on the town? For the latter, dive into the Music and Events pages this week for some highlights on what to do locally.

In the meantime, it won’t hurt to take some time for yourself in the coming week to reflect back on what the last 10 years have taught you, and, maybe, what great intentions you have for the next decade. Imagine that—where do you want to be in 2020?

Truthfully, all we have is “now,” so without sounding overly esoteric, I would be remiss if I didn’t even suggest that to “live in the moment” may be the best medicine you can give yourself in the coming year. As I’ve looked back over the last 10 years, and some of the stories we have covered here at GT, I have found that the most captivating cover topics seemed to be about people who followed their bliss, did the unconventional and lived in the here and now. It’s not a bad thing to aspire to, actually. So, here’s to 2010 and all the great opportunities ahead. And here’s to you, the readers, who keep us here and thriving. We couldn’t do this without you.

Happy New Year.

Greg Archer
Editor


Letters to Good Times Editor

High Times
A dangerously misleading quote from community studies professor Julie Guthman in "Sugar Shock" (GT 12/17) deserves clarification.  Guthman's statement that "... for adults, overweight is actually protective. It doesn't put you at increased risk for anything." That is an outdated misunderstanding which has been widely criticized by eminent nutrition professionals such as Walter Willett, MD, MPH, DrPH, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health. Guthman overlooks the reality that behavior related factors such as cigarette smoking and alcoholism, as well as a variety of chronic diseases such as cancer, may ultimately have the effect of reducing body mass.  A reduction in body mass caused by factors that may ultimately cause an earlier death does not mean that the lower body mass is the cause of the earlier death. Data analysis from a multitude of epidemiological studies shows that when the data is corrected for behaviors such as cigarette smoking and chronic diseases that tend to reduce weight, any apparent protective advantage from overweight disappears.
Also, mortality studies don't tell the whole story about whether overweight puts you at "increased risk for anything." Even when overweight doesn't reduce lifespan, it certainly increases the risk of spending a greater proportion of the later years on being sick, undergoing medical procedures, and suffering drug side effects and loss of independence.
Ed Lomasney
Scotts Valley


Making the Most of the Coast
Regarding the Slow Coast story (GT 12/22), so let me get this straight: If you're a hippy-dippy organic you are OK for the coast but if you're just a regular person, you're not wanted. Sorry, but I think that is bull pucky. What makes the organic hippy-dippy's better than regular folks? Nothing is the answer. Thats right, nothing. Wearing hemp clothing and espousing peace doesn't make one a better person, no matter what. Nor does it entitle you to property that regular folks can't get, or build where and what regular folks can't. Regular people can maybe build a house, but no more,  as building on the coast is evil. But organic hippy-dippys can build barns and what not. Huh? Ridiculous.
Paul Reese
Santa Cruz

Spending Locally
Kudos to columnist Tom Honig and his latest column (GT 12/17), which talked about spending locally. If there’s anything that the last year has taught me, it’s that I better damn well spend my dollars in this county. Who knows when things will improve financially.
Sarah Jones
Capitola

Holiday Deadlines
GOOD TIMES offices will be closed Wednesday, Dec. 23 through Friday, Jan 1 in observance of Christmas and New Year’s.

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Cardinal Grand Cross in the Sky

Following Holy Week (passion, death and burial of the Pisces World Teacher) and Easter Sunday (Resurrection Festival), from April 19 to the 23, the long-awaited and discussed Cardinal Cross of Change appears in the sky, composed of Cardinal signs Aries, Libra, Cancer, and Capricorn, with planets (13-14 degrees) Uranus (in Aries), Jupiter (in Cancer), Mars (in Libra) and Pluto (in Capricorn), an actual geometrical square or cross configuration. Cardinal signs mark the seasons of change, initiating new realities.

 

Sugar: The New Tobacco?

Proposed bill would require warning labels on sugary drinks Will soda and other saccharine libations soon come with a health warning? They will if it’s up to our state senator, Bill Monning (D-Carmel). On Feb. 27, Monning proposed first-of-its-kind legislation that would require a consumer warning label be placed on sugar-sweetened beverages sold in California. SB 1000, also known as the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Safety Warning Act, was proposed to provide vital information to consumers about the harmful effects of consuming sugary drinks, such as sodas, sports drinks, energy drinks, and sweetened teas.

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of April 17

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >

 

Growing Hope

Campos Seguros combats sexual assault in the Watsonville farmworker community Farm work was a way of life for Rocio Camargo, who grew up in Watsonville as the daughter of Mexican immigrants. Her parents met while working the fields 30 years ago, and her father went on to run Fuentes Berry Farms.
Sign up for Tomorrow's Good Times Today
Upcoming arts & events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Foodie File: Red Apple Cafe

Breakfast takes center stage at Gracia Krakauer's Red Apple Cafe Before they moved to Aptos, Gracia and her husband Dan Krakauer would visit friends in Santa Cruz County and eat at the Red Apple Café all the time. Then they moved up here from Santa Monica five years ago, and bought the Aptos location (there’s a separate one in Watsonville) from the family who owned it for two decades.

 

How would you feel about a tech industry boom in Santa Cruz?

I feel like it would ruin the small old-town feeling of Santa Cruz. It wouldn’t be the same Surf City kind of vacation town that it is. Antoinette BennettSanta Cruz | Construction Management

 

Trout Gulch Vineyards

Cinsault 2012—la grande plage diurne The most popular wines on store shelves are those most generally known and available—Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, which are all superb for sure. But when you come across a more unusual varietal, like Trout Gulch Vineyards’ Cinsault ($18), it opens up a whole new world.

 

Waddell Creek, Al Fresco

Route One Summer Farm Dinner You’ve been buying their insanely fresh produce for years now at farmers’ markets. Right? So now why not become more familiar with the gorgeous Waddell Creek farmlands of Route One Farms?