Santa Cruz Good Times

Nov 27th
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From The Editor

Greg 1editNotePlus Letters To the Editor

Change is in the air, and with change comes adjustment. And with adjustment comes reaction—or nonreaction. To which a local life coach recently shared with me: “Look at how you’re reacting. It tells you everything about ... you.” So, how are you reacting—and what are you reacting to?
Something to ponder.


In the meantime, you can find more depth in this week’s cover story, which should intrigue locals and anybody curious about self-exploration and then some. Damon Orion’s interview with revered spiritual teacher Ram Dass captures the unique soul in a revealing light. From the ’60s revolution to the art of letting go, few humans have a greater grasp of articulating how to surf through life’s challenges. Interesting? You bet.

There’s good news over at the Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music. Specifically Enrico Chapela. The enterprising composer has created a concerto featuring the electric cello played by virtuosic cellist Johannes Moser—but with a twist. Chapela actually found his inspiration from the source of that instrument’s power: electromagnetic energy. As J.D. Ramey reports in A&E, “he based the music on data from flares produced by three different magnetars, an unusual type of pulsar with the largest magnetic field in existence.”

Also in A&E, take note of one-time local author Stephanie Michel’s new novel, “The Curse of Santa Cruz,”. Santa Cruz is, of course, its lead character in many ways, but you may be surprised what locals inspired the other colorful people within her pages.

Elsewhere, be sure to turn to News this week as well, where we take note of the changes taking place with a syringe exchange program. Plus: A 540-mile bike ride worthy of our attention.
There’s plenty more in between. Thanks for reading ... and have a powerful—and empowering—week.

Greg Archer | Editor-in-Chief



In Support of Homeless Vets
Regarding the article on homeless veterans (GT 8/1), what a wonderful article. I got to know Wayne Wyman during the seven years that I worked at the Monterey Clinic and I am so very happy to read of his success in overcoming his problems. This could not be happening to a greater man. I also worked with Kelly Conway— although not a doctor as mentioned in this article, she is a true marvel and has a really caring outlook toward our Veterans. Is it any wonder that the Monterey VA Clinic, and the Palo Alto Veterans Hospital are the best Veterans medical facilities in the entire U.S. Kudos. And way to go Wayne.
Connie Redman | Santa Cruz

Taking Action on Climate Change
Regarding the discussions on climate change, I support President Obama's recently announced plan to combat climate change and advance clean energy. The plan calls for reducing carbon
pollution from power plants—our largest source of pollution driving climate change—that also harms our health
and economy.
We are already seeing the effects of climate change: storms are becoming more intense, heat waves more severe, drought more persistent and wildfire more prevalent. Superstorm Sandy alone caused more than $1 billion in damages and a loss of life that cannot be quantified.
Rising temperatures also trigger more bad-air days, which are of particular concern for the young, the elderly and those with asthma and other health issues. We can't afford to ignore these costs any longer.
Investing in renewable energy, increased efficiency and pollution controls will create jobs and a more resilient economy. In fact, history has shown when we rein in pollution we get a big bang for our
buck. Since 1970 every $1 in investment in compliance with Clean Air Act standards has produced $4-8 in economic benefits.
When it comes to our climate, the costs of inaction are mounting. We owe it to our children and future generations to rise to this challenge.
Geraldo Fuentes | Watsonville

Online Comments
On ‘Off The Streets’ ...
The article on homeless vets shows what can be done when programs are given the resources to address homelessness and they have a "can do" attitude. If the same scale of resources were directed toward the larger homeless population with the same "can do" attitude, homelessness could be addressed much more effectively in our community.
HUD-VASH of Santa Cruz County seems to want to truly serve homeless veterans. They are not just a provider. Their
attitude should be duplicated by other social service providers to the homeless—showing the homeless respect and dignity
is fundamental.
John Colby

On ‘Frosty’ ...
I grew up watching Frosty at The Point. Jay was a great surfer, soul surfer. Remember him as a little grom rippen’ it up in the early ’90s moved north before he dropped in on Mavs. Big loss on the waves when he passed. But the kid lived every day full. Chasing Mavericks was a spectacular flick. Enjoyed it and sure brought back memories of home.
Myk Lambert

Letters Policy
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photo contest

Photo-of-the-WeekFLYING HIGH Summer is in full swing at Felton Covered Bridge Park, one of San Lorenzo Valley’s most beloved parks. photo/ Louise West Submit to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Include information (location, etc.) and your name. Photos may be cropped.

good work

Thomas Hickenbottom
Santa Cruz surfing icon Thomas Hickenbottom, lost his six-year battle with cancer last week—he was 65—but he leaves behind a legacy worthy of our attention. Hickenbottom's passion for surfing began at the age of 7 and his professional surfing career garnered much praise.  He was one of the very first members of the O'Neill Surf Team in the late ’60s and also captured attention on the Arrow Surf Team. Saturday, July 21, 2012 was named Thomas Hickenbottom Day in Santa Cruz. His two books, "Surfing in Santa Cruz," and "Local Tribes," a surfing novel, also generated buzz.

good idea

Here In Spirits
“Love Monday at Discretion Brewery” unfolds Aug. 12 with a notable event that will allow 20 percent of all beer sales going to support the families of fallen Santa Cruz Police Officers Loran (Butch) Baker and Elizabeth Butler. The event runs 4-6 p.m. and is open to the public. But ... if locals can’t make the designated time, the organizers will be keeping the doors open from 11 a.m to 9 p.m. to support the cause. Discretion Brewery is located at 2702 41st Avenue in Soquel. Learn more at


“Sometimes you gotta meet people where they're at ... and sometimes ... you gotta leave them there.”
—Iyanla Ü

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