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Apr 17th
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From The Editor

Greg 1editNotePlus Letters To the Editor

Something occurred to me: My Polish mother is coming for a visit in October. I wonder if California is ready for this glorious creature. Here’s what I say: Pierogi for all!  Not that I’m short of any ideas to entertain, but should something come across your mind, drop me a line. It will be a Polish-themed October all around.

 

Onward. From entertaining parents we move toward entertaining transformation. Which is why you may find this week’s cover story interesting. Local scribe DNA explores the local men behind the formation of the Inside Men’s Foundation. It’s a unique program that finds several of the group’s founding members connecting with incarcerated men—all in an effort to help shift their own perspectives on themselves. Transformation is possible, yes, but it’s interesting to note why the local men wanted to be part of the initiative in the first place. Comment about all this or send us your thoughts to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

What’s left? How about free parking in Downtown Santa Cruz? About that ... chances are you’d be lucky to nab those free parking spots, which seem to be disappearing more quickly these days. There are 20 parking lots in Downtown Santa Cruz but fewer of them offer free spaces. How does all this play out economically for the city—factoring in how much it costs to actually pay parking officials each year? Well, that’s a good question. And certainly one we’ll continue to explore in the coming months. In the meantime, dive into our parking update.

Now that Labor Day is behind us, and school is, for the most part, back in session, the fall season should offer some festive outings, chief among them being the Santa Cruz Film Festival. Be on the watch for what filmmakers and which films make the cut this year in the coming weeks. The fest opens in November.

That’s all for now. Have a stellar week. More next time ...
Greg Archer | Editor-in-Chief


letters

 

Big ‘Heart’—Thanks
That was a terrific interview with Geoffrey Dunn (GT 8/30) on a number of levels. You and Gloria pulled off a comfortable give and take that was part marketing and  "from the heart" so the whole thing worked. I am in awe of the project and projects you are working on and this one will take over Santa Cruz as it should. Hell, I may just show up with my Dad's Salinas pictures [and] do a bit about him at one of your flash dances or whatever you call them. Love you and will see you during your tour. Bobby "Zorro" Z.
Robert B. Zufall | Santa Cruz

The Curtain Falls on SSC
Regarding Shakespeare Santa Cruz, I was more upset when UC Santa Cruz discontinued their Arts & Lectures program than their cutting Shakespeare Santa Cruz.  Arts & Lectures ran throughout the academic year, not just the summer, and offered dance, drama, world music, etc. featuring performers one wouldn't see unless they travelled to larger cities.   Hopefully the university will support projects like the wonderful multi-media "Peer Gynt" of  this past spring, and continue to support productions of opera, gamelan, other music ensembles, etc.
Judi Grunstra | Santa Cruz

What’s the Real SSC Story?
In response to a letter sent to UCSC’s vice chancellor, thank you so much for responding to the letter.  There appears to be a great deal of uncertainty and confusion regarding the budgetary figures you have released in your articles justifying the closing of SSC.  I will note that it seems you tend to quote one side of the ledger, making no public statement regarding the rent that you charge the theatre for set and costume shop rentals, rehearsal rooms, housing for the non-equity actors and acting interns, custodial service, parking spaces, salaries for the theatre arts production staff during the theatre's season.  My colleague Mike Ryan has stated that $100K of the $250,000 UCSC donated to SSC was to be spent on debt reduction rather than operating costs.  Dean Yager denies this, but someone has some 'splaining' to do, so perhaps it would be in everyone's best interests if the books were opened to the public.  I must also say I have never heard of something being called a donation and then added to a deficit.
Be that as it may, according to the editorial page of the Sentinel, you have alienated a large portion of your community.  And, with all due respect, apparently you have not spoken to the students you claim you are accountable to.  I am sure you would be surprised as to their feelings if you did.  
I spoke of the study the Yale School of Management did on Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey.  Here is the link to the study: rosenet.org/uploads/45/ skmbt_75111080212010.pdf
Mike Ryan spoke of a study underwritten by UCSC and SSC a decade ago that found SSC's economic impact on the city of Santa Cruz to be $1.7M.  And while it is obvious that, as you say, you 'have not been able to find a way that SSC can continue without this level of  financial support despite many efforts and a lot of hard work,' perhaps if you sat down with the city of Santa Cruz and SSC, a compromise could be found that would make all three parties happy.  
Conan McCarty | Santa Cruz

Online Comments
On ‘The Pump Track Solution’ ...
I am so glad to know more about the mountain biking and tracks in SC. My daughter recently got into it and has gotten quite good. I did notice the sport seemed to be male dominated so to hear a report from a female writer helps me have faith. —Gilda


Letters Policy
Letters should not exceed 300 words and may be edited for length, clarity, grammar and spelling. They should include city of residence to be considered for publication. Please direct letters to the editor, query letters and employment queries to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ." All classified and display advertising queries should be directed to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ." All website-related queries, including corrections, should be directed to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ."


photo contest
otter


Such a poser This picture was taken in Moss Landing when a local couple was trying to get ready for a kayak adventure. This mischievous sea otter was playful enough to jump into the kayak and even posed still for several pictures. photo/Maritza Allen. Submit to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Include information (location, etc.) and your name. Photos may be cropped.


good work



Don Husing
The passing of newsman Don Husing last week did not go unnoticed. He was 71. His 47-year tenure at KSCO made him a local legend. Husing came to KSCO in 1966. He was  serving in the Army at Ford Ord at the time. He anchored KSCO’s control room and his skills were vast and included broadcasting news, weather and traffic reports, producing and hosting the Hawaii Calls program. He also co-hosted the “Good Morning Monterey Bay” commute show with Sleepy John Sandidge, Fred Riese, and Rosemary Chalmers. According to friends and colleagues, Husing “loved radio, and he lived it.”

good idea



Saving Shakespeare Santa Cruz
Last week’s news that Shakespeare Santa Cruz had been cut by the UCSC Arts department created a stir in the community. Cost overruns and debt issues were sighted as one of the main reasons, however, some locals think otherwise. Regardless, it doesn’t hurt to ponder the question: Can SSC be saved? A new blog dubbed “Save Shakespeare Santa Cruz’ is up on civinomics.com/workshops. Check it out and keep the discussion going. Send us your thoughts at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


quote



“It didn’t hurt. It’s not like I haven’t heard criticism about my performance in the Oscars. Or jokes about my choice of gay roles. I feel great and I feel everyone was awesome.”
James Franco (on being roasted)


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Growing Hope

Campos Seguros combats sexual assault in the Watsonville farmworker community Farm work was a way of life for Rocio Camargo, who grew up in Watsonville as the daughter of Mexican immigrants. Her parents met while working the fields 30 years ago, and her father went on to run Fuentes Berry Farms.

 

Cardinal Grand Cross in the Sky

Following Holy Week (passion, death and burial of the Pisces World Teacher) and Easter Sunday (Resurrection Festival), from April 19 to the 23, the long-awaited and discussed Cardinal Cross of Change appears in the sky, composed of Cardinal signs Aries, Libra, Cancer, and Capricorn, with planets (13-14 degrees) Uranus (in Aries), Jupiter (in Cancer), Mars (in Libra) and Pluto (in Capricorn), an actual geometrical square or cross configuration. Cardinal signs mark the seasons of change, initiating new realities.

 

Sugar: The New Tobacco?

Proposed bill would require warning labels on sugary drinks Will soda and other saccharine libations soon come with a health warning? They will if it’s up to our state senator, Bill Monning (D-Carmel). On Feb. 27, Monning proposed first-of-its-kind legislation that would require a consumer warning label be placed on sugar-sweetened beverages sold in California. SB 1000, also known as the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Safety Warning Act, was proposed to provide vital information to consumers about the harmful effects of consuming sugary drinks, such as sodas, sports drinks, energy drinks, and sweetened teas.

 

Animal Magnetism

Bear, mouse dare to be friends in charming ‘Ernest and Celestine’ It’s not exactly Romeo and Juliet. It’s not even a romance, although it is a love story about two individuals separated by prejudice who find the courage to form an unshakable bond despite the rules and traditions that keep them apart.
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Foodie File: Red Apple Cafe

Breakfast takes center stage at Gracia Krakauer's Red Apple Cafe Before they moved to Aptos, Gracia and her husband Dan Krakauer would visit friends in Santa Cruz County and eat at the Red Apple Café all the time. Then they moved up here from Santa Monica five years ago, and bought the Aptos location (there’s a separate one in Watsonville) from the family who owned it for two decades.

 

How would you feel about a tech industry boom in Santa Cruz?

I feel like it would ruin the small old-town feeling of Santa Cruz. It wouldn’t be the same Surf City kind of vacation town that it is. Antoinette BennettSanta Cruz | Construction Management

 

Best of Santa Cruz County

The 2013 Santa Cruz County Readers' Poll and Critics’ Picks It’s our biggest issue of the year, and in it, your votes—more than 6,500 of them—determined the winners of The Best of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll. New to the long list of local restaurants, shops and other notables that captured your interest: Best Beer Selection, Best Locally Owned Business, Best Customer Service and Best Marijuana Dispensary. In the meantime, many readers were ever so chatty online about potential new categories. Some of the suggestions that stood out: Best Teen Program and Best Web Design/Designer. But what about: Dog Park, Church, Hotel, Local Farm, Therapist (I second that!) or Sports Bar—not to be confused with Bra. Our favorite suggestion: Best Act of Kindness—one reader noted Café Gratitude and the free meals it offered to the Santa Cruz Police Department in the aftermath of recent crimes. Perhaps some of these can be woven into next year’s ballot, so stay tuned. In the meantime, enjoy the following pages and take note of our Critics’ Picks, too, beginning on page 91. A big thanks for voting—and for reading—and an even bigger congratulations to all of the winners. Enjoy.  -Greg Archer, EditorBest of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll INDEX

 

Trout Gulch Vineyards

Cinsault 2012—la grande plage diurne The most popular wines on store shelves are those most generally known and available—Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, which are all superb for sure. But when you come across a more unusual varietal, like Trout Gulch Vineyards’ Cinsault ($18), it opens up a whole new world.