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Oct 02nd
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From The Editor

Greg 1editNotePlus Letters To the Editor

Let’s face it, the moods swing. Sometimes too often for some of us. But if you ever think you don’t have it in you to get through something challenging, perhaps this week’s cover story on Santa Cruzan Alekz Londos will help you shift some limited thinking. Londos, perhaps one of the most enterprising locals we’ve come across in the past year, has a tremendous amount of disaster-relief training under his belt. He’s also quite brave. In the past decade, he’s been on hand for relief efforts in the aftermaths of several storms and hurricanes that plagued the United States and beyond. 

 

This week, the photojournalist and humanitarian shares with GT his story—and his captivating photos—of his experience offering aid in the Phillipines in the wake of the tragic typhoon that struck the region in November of 2013. Learn more about Londos’ unique disaster-relief kits, too, among other things, which he’s created as he moves forward in his personal mission to become a better humanitarian.

Lately, I have been intrigued with the subject of survival. Some of that has to do with being in the midst of penning a memoir on my Polish family’s tale during the 1940s in the wake of Stalin’s wrath. But survival themes have been illuminated to winning ends recently in pop culture. I’m not talking about Lohan and Bieber. Just one look at some of the films that made a dent last year—Captain Phillips, Gravity, 12 Years A Slave and The Book Thief—and you can see that survival theme in full glory. What is that thing that makes us perservere—against all odds? It takes grit. Some grace, too. Either way, we all seem to have it in us. We just need to access it. Alekz Londos has. This week, we’re fortunate to receive some big reminders about all of that—and how fragile life can actually be. 

Onward ...

Greg Archer | Editor-in-Chief


letters

 

Healthcare and You
Regarding the recent “Local Talk” (GT 3/6), I  was disappointed to see the responses to the question: "How have you been affected by healthcare reform?” They were not accurate about how necessary ACA is. It seems many people do not understand how the insurance works. 

You can even get a catastrophic policy if you would pay more than 8 percent of your income for the low-cost bronze policy. I could not afford any insurance last year due to a pre-existing condition and Anthem's policy, even under the state, became too much. Now I am insured with Blue Shield of California and I pay $30 for a doctor's visit and my prescriptions are less.

For all of us, the main issue and the time that a deductible really comes into play is when you have to go for a surgical procedure or cancer treatments or any long-term treatments. Then you will be happy to only have to pay, at the most, that deductible. Believe me, I know. If you do not have those problems, then you are still paying less for visits and prescriptions. You can get the catastrophic coverage for almost nothing to cover you if you ever get ill or are in an accident and you can get a wellness visit with it. Good Times has a responsibility to do a better job of educating the community it serves.

Linda Milgate | Santa Cruz

Online Comments

On ‘Race For the Third ...’ 
Lomonica has been speaking out on various issues for decades. He just may have a point on the progressive lockdown of Santa Cruz society. As the old saying goes: “Power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely.” After 40 years, there are many who are tired of the good ol' progressive network.

—Steven  D. Hartman

On ‘Capitola Book Café ...’
It's amazing the decline and bric-à-brac filled shelves of recent years. As a loyal supporter, and sad bystander, it's not the e-book that killed the cafe but the pathetic lack of business skills. It should have roared, instead random cookies were offered as an after-thought. The brand is worthy of a group swoop. Any takers?

—Christine Flaherty

I would ask Ms. Flaherty if she has ever run an independent bookstore? This commentary is cruel and easily spoken as a "sad bystander." If you have stood by and seen this coming and had a miracle cure up your sleeve, why didn't you come forward? I think there are many issues of which you are not aware. Where is your house of glass? I want to throw a brick through it. 

—Cynthia Fraula-Haun

As an employee of the bookstore for the past six and a half years, I can tell you that it was passion and a commitment to the community that kept the store from closing a few years ago. Cookies, bric-à-brac, magazines, books, free events, wine events, great service—whatever it took to keep our customers coming back. 

The current owners put up a good fight. Thank you from all of us in the community for your dedication over the past years.

 —Tamera

On ‘Water, Water, Water ...’
1. Remove/salvage RR tracks, invest $100-plus million to construct a bike path, plus recycled water mains ... Recycle 100 percent wastewater from both Watsonville and Santa Cruz. 2. Redesign Zayante Diversion Dam, pump 80 percent large storm flow up to quarries transformed into reservoirs /recreation areas. 3. Set up conservation accounts on water agency invoices. Visit "Water Solutions for Santa Cruz County" at billsmallman.com for more on these plans.

 —Bill Smallman

Letters Policy
Letters should not exceed 300 words and may be edited for length, clarity, grammar and spelling. They should include city of residence to be considered for publication. Please direct letters to the editor, query letters and employment queries to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ." All classified and display advertising queries should be directed to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ."  All website-related queries, including corrections, should be directed to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ."


photo contest


letters POW
RUBBLE AND PLAY  Children in the Tacloban region of the Philippines find brief comfort amidst the destruction in the aftermath of Super Typhon Haiyan in November of 2013. (See page 14.) photo//Alekz londos. Submit This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Include information (location, etc.) and your name. Photos may be cropped. Preferably, photos should be 4 inches by 4 inches and minimum 250 dpi.


good work



A Deeper Look at Barbie
A study by researchers at UC Santa Cruz and Oregon State University found that girls who play with Barbies believe they have fewer career options available to them than boys do. The authors published an article about their findings, titled “Boys Can Be Anything: Effect of Barbie Play on Girls' Career Cognitions," on March 5 in the Springer journal Sex Roles. The results were the same irrespective of what the Barbie was wearing (“Doctor Barbie” versus “Fashion Barbie”).


good idea


Dining for Women Day
The Santa Cruz chapter of Dining for Women—a global giving circle dedicated to raising money for women and girls in the developing world so that they can achieve their potential, gain equality, and overcome economic limitations and social bias—will host founder Marsha Wallace, at a special event at the Tannery Arts Center Gallery on March 23. Mayor Lynn Robinson will proclaim March 23 “Marsha Wallace-Dining for Women Day in Santa Cruz.” Attendees will enjoy wine, appetizers, music, a raffle and presentation. RSVP by March 19 by emailing This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

quote


Caroline-Myss

“Live one day at a time. Keep your attention in present time. Have no expectations. Make no judgments. And give up the need to know why things happen as they do. Give it up.” —Caroline Myss




Comments (1)Add Comment
Re: Book Cafe Demise.
written by George Ow, Jr., March 13, 2014
The Capitola Book Cafe owners and staff fought the good fight and stayed alive, doing what they could when most people would have given up or died a long time ago. Blaming them is like blaming the dinosaurs when they died out or the buggy whip manufacturers when cars came on the scene.

Please note that in the last decade, thousands of independent and chain book stores have gone belly up, closed, kaput. There are urban areas with hundreds of thousands of people, even millions of people, without a real book store.

Amazon has spent billions of dollars cornering the book market and has now expanded into many other areas. Their money comes from hedge funds and other investors. They don't need to make a profit now. They are after market share--meaning that they want to knock out all competition and be the last one standing. What do you think will happen to prices then?

Amazon and other internet marketeers were subsidized by not having to pay sales taxes. This put bricks and mortar businesses at a disadvantage.

Kindles and non-paper books are changing the business.

Things are always changing. Always, some people are helped and some people are hurt. If you like having local book stores, then go and buy books at Bookshop Santa Cruz, Logos, Crossroads and Literary Guillatine. It's up to us.

George Ow, Jr.

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On the Waterfront

As the wharf celebrates its centennial, a personal reflection on its essential place in Santa Cruz’s history

 

Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, occurs this year during Libra, the sign of creating right relations with all aspects life and with earth’s kingdoms. We contemplate (the Libra meditation) forgiveness, which means, “to give for another.” Forgiveness is not pardon. It’s a sacrifice (fire in the heart, giving from the heart). Forgiveness is giving up for the good of the other. This is the law of evolution (the path of return).

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of September 26

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
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Melinda’s

New Capitola bakery takes gluten-free goods to the next level

 

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Best of Santa Cruz County

The 2013 Santa Cruz County Readers' Poll and Critics’ Picks It’s our biggest issue of the year, and in it, your votes—more than 6,500 of them—determined the winners of The Best of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll. New to the long list of local restaurants, shops and other notables that captured your interest: Best Beer Selection, Best Locally Owned Business, Best Customer Service and Best Marijuana Dispensary. In the meantime, many readers were ever so chatty online about potential new categories. Some of the suggestions that stood out: Best Teen Program and Best Web Design/Designer. But what about: Dog Park, Church, Hotel, Local Farm, Therapist (I second that!) or Sports Bar—not to be confused with Bra. Our favorite suggestion: Best Act of Kindness—one reader noted Café Gratitude and the free meals it offered to the Santa Cruz Police Department in the aftermath of recent crimes. Perhaps some of these can be woven into next year’s ballot, so stay tuned. In the meantime, enjoy the following pages and take note of our Critics’ Picks, too, beginning on page 91. A big thanks for voting—and for reading—and an even bigger congratulations to all of the winners. Enjoy.  -Greg Archer, EditorBest of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll INDEX

 

Apricot Wine for Dessert

Thomas Kruse Winery, a participant in the new Santa Clara Wine Trail, has been around for a long time—since 1971, to be exact. When our little group arrived to try some wine at the Kruses’ low-key tasting room, Thomas Kruse and his wife Karen were there to greet us. Theirs is a small operation, and they’re proud to offer quality wine at affordable prices. “Because we are small and low-tech, it’s easy to relate to the whole winemaking process,” says Karen—and the Kruses take pride in making wine “just like it has been made for centuries.”