Santa Cruz Good Times

Oct 06th
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From The Editor

Greg 1editNote

Plus Letters to the Editor

It’s spring and the time is ripe to unleash some good. “Spring cleaning,” too, which is always “good,” but what about spreading some more good juju out there? True, it sounds rather California Woo Woo, but look around—we happen to be in a kind of Mecca. Besides, you’re reading a newspaper with the word Good in its title, so there’s that.

But I digress. The point is this: give some good, get some good. But let go of your attachment to “get” and just focus on the giving. Think of it as a Do Something Good Campaign. Try it. See what happens. And then ... send us your story of Good to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it for a chance to win something really good—all that, and, of course, a chance for your story to be read/heard by GT’s readers. What constitutes as “good?” Snap out of it—you know better. But for the newbies on the block, it can be anything from a smile to sending a letter off to somebody, to helping out somebody in need. The ripple effects of such actions may just surprise you. Tell us all about it. Have fun—and good luck.

Something good may be on the horizon in Santa Cruz County—sort of. Take a look at this week’s cover story. Penned by Elizabeth Limbach, it reveals a relevent topic that promises to capture local interest: food waste. More than 100 communities across the country participate in some type of food waste/compost recycling program. Santa Cruz County does not offer compost collection, which is surprising considering that back in 2009, San Francisco became the first U.S. city to mandate such a program. In other words, bring on the compost bins. Learn more about what is developing behind the scenes to actually make that happen locally.

In the meantime, here’s to your week ahead. Make something good happen. Onward ...

Greg Archer | Editor-in-Chief



All Those Millennials
Regarding the Gen Y cover story (GT 3/20), I've appreciated the recent attention to how the criticism of the Millennials is merely the latest incarnation of the “kids today” argument. GT isn't the only publication to point this out. But what seemed so refreshingly new to me about Rall's particular article was that instead of denigration, namely in a “get-your-own-culture-and-stop-using-ours” direction, there was a celebrated recognition. Thanks.
C.R. Woods | Santa Cruz

Online Comments
On ‘Gen Y/Gen X ...’         
As a Gen Y reading in your perspective, I'm glad our gap isn't a huge issue. Most of our aggression is aimed toward the boomers and others that surpress our ability to voice our opinion. Once Gen X fully takes over (in terms of media/politics/etc.), I'm sure things will start looking in a positive way. And no, we (I can really only speak for myself) do not hate Gen X. I believe the feelings are mutual.
—Gen Y 21

The new book “The Next America: Boomers, Millennials and the Looming Generational Showdown,” by PEW executive vice president Paul Taylor lends interesting insight and info to this discussion.
—GT Reader

This is one of the best articles on Gen X/Gen Y in a long time. Thank you for writing it.

The cover illustration is fantastic!!! I really enjoyed the article too. Nice work Good Times.

On ‘Lost and Found...
My sister was able to ID the perpetrator who kidnapped her emotional assistance cat using a partially activated microchip. If it had been fully activated, the U.S. Department of Justice would have been forced to put the kidnapper in prison for violating Section 901 of the Fair Housing Act. Every person who has an emotional assistance or a service animal should have them microchipped as well as fully activating the chip.
—Dr. John Colby

This is really silly. Yet another law that will just bring in revenue. I understand the idea behind this, but to make it mandatory is ridiculous. If you’re going to make it a law, at least provide the service for free. You should do this with Spay/Neuter, too, but alas, it’s just another way for them to make money. If you want to reach out to the community, especially the low- income folks who need these services the most, you have to make them available to everyone and for no cost. And, yes, with the money the shelter makes and the donations and funds, it
is possible.

On ‘Water Water Water ...’
#1. Remove/Salvage RR tracks, invest 100+ million to construct bike path + recycled water mains + injections wells + solar panels other utilities instead of a train. Recycle 100 percent wastewater from both Watsonville and Santa Cruz for effective use. #2. Redesign Zayante Diversion Dam, pump 80 percent large storm flow up to quarries transformed into reservoirs /recreation areas. #3 Set up conservation accounts on water agency invoices. High incentives for homeowners to install conservation upgrades on their homes. Visit "Water Solutions for Santa Cruz County."
—Bill Smallman

Letters Policy
Letters should not exceed 300 words and may be edited for length, clarity, grammar and spelling. They should include city of residence to be considered for publication. Please direct letters to the editor, query letters and employment queries to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ." All classified and display advertising queries should be directed to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ."  All website-related queries, including corrections, should be directed to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ."

photo contestLetters pow

WALK THIS WAY  This seagull on a stroll was photographed along the coast. photo//Jeff o’bannon. Submit This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Include information (location, etc.) and your name. Photos may be cropped. Preferably, photos should be 4 inches by 4 inches and minimum 250 dpi.

good work

Mid-County Senior Center
It’s good to be 40. That’s the consensus for the member-owned nonprofit Mid-County Senior Center in Capitola. The center, which is open for membership to anyone above 50 and boasts about 550 members, hits a milestone this month with its big 4-0. There will be an anniversary event from 1-4 p.m. Saturday, March 29 at the center, located at 829 Bay Ave., in Capitola. Events include demonstrations of variety of the activities and classes that typically unfold at the center, so it’s a terrific opportunity to check everything out. See you there.

good idea

Homeless Garden Project
Good news for the Homeless Garden Project. The revered local entity has  opened its doors in a permanent store in the Cooper House Breezeway in Downtown Santa Cruz. Locals have enjoyed HGP’s holiday offerings in that same spot over the years, but take note: The store is now open noon-7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and noon-6 p.m. Sunday. You can discover myriad products made from the HGP farm as well as other products from artists and craftsmen. Stop by or visit for information and details.

Lettes suess

“Why fit in when you were born to stand out?”
—Dr. Suess

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The Pope has come and gone, but his loving presence ignited new hope and goodness in many. While he was in NYC, China’s ruler arrived in Washington D.C. East (China) and West (Rome), meeting in the middle, under Libra, balancing sign of Right Relations. The Pope arrived at Fall Equinox. Things initiated at Fall Equinox are birthed at Winter Solstice. The Pope’s presence was a ritual, an initiation rite—like the Dalai Lama’s visits—offering prayers, teachings and blessings. Rituals anchor God’s plan into the world, initiating us to new realities, new rules. The Pope’s presence brings forth the Soul of the United States, its light piercing the veils of materialism. The Pope’s visit changed things. New questions arise, new reasons for living. A new wave of emerging life fills the air. Like a cocoon shifting, wings becoming visible. The winds are different now. Calling us to higher vision, moral values, virtues that reaffirm and offer hope for humanity. A changing of the guard has occurred. Appropriately, this is the week of the Jewish Festival of Sukkoth (’til Oct. 4), when we build temporary homes (little huts in nature), entering into a harvest of prayer and thanksgiving, understanding our fragile and impermanent existences. We are summoned to reflect upon our lives, our humanity, our nature, our spirit and each other. Offering gratitude, becoming a magnet for others. We observe. We see the needs. We love more.
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