Santa Cruz Good Times

Nov 28th
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From The Editor


Greg 1editNotePlus Letters To the Editor

Somebody wise said that when you need a sign from the Universe to help you through life’s more curious moments, you can always find it in sentences that contain three words. There’s “Don’t freak out.” Or “Get over it.”  And, of course, the durable “Let it go.” (We could all use a little guidance with that last one perhaps.)

This is my final editor’s note in Good Times. After 14 years at the paper—and nearly that long as its editor (I suspect that’s a GT history record]—the winds of fate have shifted and I am embarking on new paths, both bold and empowering. That’s a good thing, but first, let’s talk about you.

Or, in this case, the many diverse people that make up Santa Cruz County. I have always been staggered by the vast amount of creativity, ideology, humanitarianism and spunk found in the locals who live here and the news that unfolds here. You truly are marvels, and if it were not for you—and all that you do to inspire and/or provoke change (and sometimes unnerve)—there would not have been anything to put on these pages during my tenure. You make it happen. You have been the biggest blessing a writer and an editor could ask for. A deep, heartfelt thank you.

When I first arrived at GT in May of 2000, it was a very different creature. Not much time passed before I was given the responsibility of overseeing many of its transformations. Today, it’s an award-winning enterprise with numerous publishing arms, thanks, in part, to many people—too many to list but you know who you are. I trust that GT will venture forth with gusto. So, for now, I pass the baton. The paper turns 40 next year. (Read all about it!) But, you know, there’s a Polish saying that comes to mind: Sto Lot! I’d tell you to Google it, but why the hell bury the lead on the Internet? It means (more or less): “May you live 100 years.” Cheers to that. And with that, I’ll, leave you with one more word another wise person mused: “Onward …”

Greg Archer | Editor-in-Chief



Back to the Land Boomer

Although I  believe in the article's Goncharoff quote, "If people can compost their own food scraps, and use it on their own yards or gardens, that's better anyway," it is impractical in the close-quartered area in which I reside. I have heard that Menlo Park as well as San Francisco collects compost curbside as well. That is not a huge community. I really don't   understand why, if discussions began 10 years ago, and may take "the next five or so years" to implement, once decided upon, that Santa Cruz County hasn't come up with a plan (keep it simple?) and moved on this issue. In that time, surely land could have been found as an accessible site from which to sell and distribute the "gold" earth.

A. Ray | Santa Cruz

Welcome to Modern Politics

The recent “scandal,” if it can be called that, involving city council candidate Tim Goncharoff and the alleged campaign endorsements by manufactured profiles on Facebook is most certainly a harsh introduction into modern politics for a first time candidate. However, it also serves to illustrate two salient points about modern political campaigns. First, although no one over the age of 15 considers Facebook a serious news medium, candidates for city council are public persons who must respect the power of any electronic forum to affect their candidacies for good or ill. Second, it sadly reflects a need to reduce any potential public servant to the lowest common denominator. As a seemingly perennial candidate for elected office, I accept the fact that the voters expect better from those who aspire to public office. But that does not mean they shouldn’t also expect better of themselves.

Steve Pleich | Santa Cruz

Online Comments

On ‘Gen Y/Gen X ...’            

This article definitely illustrates the cultural division between Gen X and Gen Y. Did the author even watch Arrested Development? It was packed with major plot points that actually had long-term impacts on the characters, as opposed to Cheers or Seinfeld, which were great shows, but could easily be watched out of order, as the plots were minimal.

—Lauren Gilroy

On ‘Compost ... ’

According to the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, decentralized, small-scale composting efforts produce more jobs than landfilling and incineration combined and more than medium-sized or large-sized composting operations. The message is clear: recover uneaten food locally, for example, on a college/university campus, in strategically located parts of a municipality, etc., compost the food scraps on-site or locally (in a biologically and economically efficient manner that is enclosed, low-odor, and that will not attract undesirables), and use the nutrient-dense compost to revitalize soil and to grow and to distribute/market nutritious food locally. The nutrients in uneaten food are to vital to be flushed into a sanitary sewer system. They must be recovered and returned to the soil!

—Nicholas Smith-Sebasto, Ph.D.

On ‘Critical Mass ... ’

Great article! We're big fans of Jacob Martinez from ETR and have partnered with him on many projects. Most recently he recruited 12 WHS kids to participate in our summer tech camp. They made "College Mentor App" that got them national press . We're looking forward to the opening of the Digital NEST!

—Thomas Gelder

Letters Policy
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photo contest

letters POWUSE

Down by the seashore  A colorful snapshot of the Boardwalk. photo//Amy Spencer. Submit This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Include information (location, etc.) and your name. Photos may be cropped. Preferably, photos should be 4 inches by 4 inches and minimum 250 dpi.



good work

A Boon for UCSC

UC Santa Cruz recently received a $2 million gift from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation that will honor the legacy of late UCSC professor of natural history Kenneth S. Norris. It will go toward a new Kenneth S. Norris Center for Natural History, the Natural History Field Quarter (an immersive course that Norris founded) and a new competitive grants program, according to a press release from the school.

good idea

Bigger Beer Garden For SCMB

Santa Cruz Mountain Brewing has an awfully small seating area for such a popular community hotspot. Luckily for its thirsty denizens, the brewery recently launched a crowd-sourcing campaign on Indiegogo to raise funds to expand its beer garden by the summertime. Visit to donate or learn more.


“Shift happens.”

—Robert Holden

Comments (3)Add Comment
one paper or two?
written by clifford barney, April 05, 2014
Would it be impolite to suggest that Greg Archer's departure from the good times has something to do with its sale to the SC Weekly? Though this was the lead story in the sentinel, neither weekly has even mentioned it in its news columns - at least I haven't seen it. The Weekly offers a publisher's letter that looks like a full-page ad, and makes the extraordinary assertion that the sale is better for readers since we have only one weekly paper to consult. Good grief. I don't think i have ever seen such a fatuous claim elsewhere, and certainly not from any respected journalistic source. Something is happening here, and none of us knows what it is, for all the news we get from either weekly.

Frankly, had I the choice of which paper would survive, I would pick the good times, which offers, I think, much better local coverage. So long, Greg, it was good to know ye.
Sto lot, my friend
written by Laurel C., April 04, 2014
Excellent note, Greg. You are a true class act. You made a difference. You built something good. Be proud. (Gong!!!)
Greg Archer's beautiful, classy & poignant goodbye letter
written by Dyane Harwood, April 03, 2014
Greg Archer has done a truly amazing job over the past fourteen years at Good Times. His inspiration, vision, and outstanding writing will be sorely missed. Archer's staff has been amazing as well. Along with thousands of other loyal readers in our community, I wish Greg Archer the absolute best. Thank you from the bottom of my heart for creating such a wonderful newspaper. Onward, yes, and I can't wait to see what Archer's next labor of love is. But I can't help but think that Thursdays, for me, will never be the same.

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