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Jun 30th
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From The Editor

ednote stevePlus Letters To the Editor



 

Marin Alsop took over as music director of the Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music in 1992, just a couple of years after I came to Santa Cruz, and I wrote about her in one of my first music stories for the Register-Pajaronian not long after. It was very early in her career, and back then, none of us knew she was on her way to becoming the first woman to lead a major American orchestra, and the first conductor to receive a MacArthur Genius Grant. But we were certainly fascinated by the direction in which she pledged to take the festival, focusing it solely on living composers. The pattern that would become her life’s work—making classical music relevant and real to contemporary audiences—was already emerging.

Personally, I’ve never encountered anyone who in her interviews, writings and podcasts has given me more insight into the genre—which, as a musical heathen growing up on punk and indie rock, I never even knew I could care about. But whether it’s making me understand why the music world thought Mahler was insane when he debuted his first symphony, or how the range of the human ear affects the way we react so profoundly to Strauss’ Also Sprach Zarathustra, Alsop has a way of imbuing the music with cool, and her passion is infectious. I’ve been impressed that as her career has blown up over the last two decades, she’s maintained her connection to the Cabrillo Festival, where it all began. In this week’s cover story, Christina Waters welcomes her back after her health issues last year, and explains what cool craziness—Bela Fleck’s banjo concerto?—we can expect from her and the Cabrillo Festival this year.

Steve Palopoli | Editor-in-Chief


letters

 

WATER’S FINE?
Re: “Tainted Waters” (GT, 7/16): As a long-time surfer, father and grandfather, I find it an incredulously interesting contradiction that the City of Santa Cruz posts signs warning people about the poor quality of the water at Cowell Beach, while at the same time running their very popular and necessary Junior Lifeguards program in the same tainted water. So does that mean we care less about our current and future lifeguards than we do about the public?
—Jack Young | Scotts Valley

THUS SPOKE ZARATHUSTRA
I am in complete agreement with Jim Lewis, who objects (Letters, GT, 7/9) to the handful of morons who hold Santa Cruz hostage each weekend with the loud ugly noise of their motorcycles.
What mental dissonance Harley riders must experience, imagining themselves as heroes, while forcing onto all around such hideous sonic blight. The bloated disease of bikers’ fart fetish pollutes the air, an attack on the freedom of any who value tranquility or indeed, their hearing. The police do nothing to prevent this health and safety hazard, yet they have forced the great Morgani off the streets... for playing accordion?
It is entirely possible to find happiness without annoying everybody around you. Failure to do so is not heroism, but laziness and selfish lack of imagination. One might call it cognitive flatulence.
—Miles Zarathustra | Santa Cruz

Re: Jordan Graham
Back in the day, my friends and I slaved over Super 8 backyard masterpieces, editing with razor blades.  We just did it for ourselves.  
So I'm glad that today’s tools and markets allow young people with ideas like Graham to take these projects all the way into distribution—with tons of hard work, true, but almost no money! A market for DIY B-movies actually exists.  This is great news.
— Jim Jones

Re: Cowell Beach
The sewage outfall pipe needs to be extended to the deep canyon underwater. Until this is done, the water will continue to be polluted by the sewage outfall...and the Westside will continue to smell like an outhouse at low tide.
— Bruce Peddy


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photo contest

photo-contest

GENERATING SOME BUZZ Red dragonfly at the BlackMouse Disc Golf Course in Felton. Photograph by Mark Schleicher.
Submit to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Include information (location, etc.) and your name. Photos may be cropped. Preferably, photos should be 4 inches by 4 inches and minimum 250 dpi.



good work



Staying Abreast
Janet Hoover, the lactation consultant laid off by Dominican Hospital, has launched her own private practice with a new Facebook page called Breastfeed Santa Cruz. Hoover is offering to come into mothers’ homes for prenatal and postpartum breastfeeding help. Meanwhile, her posts offer useful tidbits on everything from baby stomach size to what drugs are safe for breastfeeding moms.


good idea



Art for Kids
Santa Cruz has a lot of art, but getting started often comes with a hefty price tag. That’s where Santa Cruz Performing Arts makes a difference. The nonprofit offers affordable classes and scholarship programs to help kids get involved in music, theater and dance. With summer productions Alice in Wonderland and Bat Boy: The Musical—at the Santa Cruz Vets Memorial Building, the SCPA brings art back to the people.


quote


There is no logical reason to stop women from conducting. The baton isn't heavy. It weighs an ounce. No superhuman strength is required.

- Marin Alsop


Comments (1)Add Comment
Community Relations Specialist, City of Santa Cruz Public Works Department
written by Janice Bisgaard, July 24, 2014
Re: Cowell Beach

The Public Works Department appreciates your concern regarding Santa Cruz beach water quality.

First of all we’d like to point out that there is no sewage pipe that drains into Cowell Beach. The contamination there is difficult to pinpoint and we are working to solve the problem.

The outfall pipe from the Santa Cruz Wastewater Treatment Facility carries treated wastewater and does not run under Cowell Beach but rather it crosses under the westside near Almar Beach. The ocean outfall point for this treated effluent is one mile off shore of Natural Bridges State Park and over 100 feet below the surface of the ocean.

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I Was a Teenage Deadhead

Memories of life on tour, plus the truth about that legendary Santa Cruz Acid Test

 

I Build a Lighted House and Therein Dwell

Wednesday, June 24, Chiron turns stationary retrograde (we turn inward) at 21.33 degrees Pisces. We usually speak of “retrograde” when referring to Mercury. But all planets retrograde. Next month in July, Venus retrogrades. What is Chiron retrograde? Chiron represents the wound within all of us. Wounds have purpose. They sensitize us; make us aware of pain and suffering. Through our wounds we develop compassion. Through compassion we become whole (holy) again. Chiron helps develop these states of consciousness. Everyone carries a wound. Everyone carries family wounds (family astrology tracks the astrological “DNA” through generations). Chiron wounds are deep within. We’re often not aware of them until Chiron retrogrades. Then the wounds (through pain, hurt, sadness, suffering) become apparent. They seem to break us open emotionally, psychologically. Painful events from the past are remembered. They are brought to the present for healing. Through experiencing, talking about and deeply feeling what is hurting us, healing takes place. We begin to understand and bring healing to others. All week, Jupiter and Venus move closer together in the sky. They meet in Leo at the full moon, Cancer solar festival, on Wednesday, July 1. The Cancer keynote is, “I build a lighted house and therein dwell.” The soul’s light has finally penetrated the “womb” of matter. The New Group of World Servers is to radiate this light. At the end of each sign are keywords to use and remember during the Chiron retrograde.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of June 26

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
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Kickin' Chicken

Local kitchen alchemist Justin Williams is fast becoming a cult flavor master. His late-night wizardry, which began last fall delivering mainly to starving UCSC students, is catching on with taste buds beyond campus. Kickin’ Chicken delivers its spicy-sweet fried chicken and waffles to Westside residents between 9 p.m. and 2 a.m. nightly. Or you can catch him and his brother and sister, Candice and Danny Mendoza, serving it up at their “Sunday Mass” at the Santa Cruz Food Lounge at 1001 Center St. in Santa Cruz. Using sous vide, a French method of cooking chicken in a water bath at a tightly controlled temperature, they then flash fry it for an amazingly crispy coat. Candice Mendoza spoke to GT about Kickin’ Chicken’s rise.

 

What’s a creative new approach to addressing summer beach litter?

Robotic dogs, with duct tape on their paws, that walk around picking up litter wherever they go. Joaquin Heinz, Santa Cruz, Barista

 

Pelican Ranch Winery

The most popular red wines found on store shelves are also those most commonly known, such as Pinot, Zinfandel and Merlot. But when you come across a more unusual varietal, like Pelican Ranch Winery’s Cinsault ($19), it opens up a whole new world. Cinsault is a grape that can tolerate heat, so it is found in countries with warmer climes such as Morocco, Algeria, Lebanon, and France. It’s rare in California but grows well in places like Lodi—Silvaspoons Vineyard in this particular case—where it’s hot and dry. Often used as a blending grape, the silky Cinsault is just fine on its own.

 

Open Wide

Soif’s soft reboot leads to expanded menu, plus the ‘thinking woman’s ketchup’