Santa Cruz Good Times

Wednesday
Sep 02nd
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

From the Editor

greg_archerS2sPlus Letters to Good Times
Desal Disappointment
Look At This Way…

On Jan. 12, a 7.0 earthquake rocked Haiti leaving it in ruins. Three months later, residents and relief workers in the island’s capital, Port-au-Prince, are still picking up the pieces, emotionally and otherwise. Our country poured out massive support, and so did a creative entity here, known as Shelter Systems, created by local Bob Gillis—the man sold his first patent for a small tent design back in 1975. Gillis, and his unique 14-foot dome tents are the subject of this week’s compelling cover story, penned by Linda Koffman.

Here, we learn more about Gillis’ inspirations and how his creative concepts are suddenly providing tent refuge for thousands of Haitians, struggling to get their lives back in order. Learn more about this fascinating, uplifting tale on page 14. In the meantime, if you need some guidance on how and where to donate, take note of several local portals in which you can do so. There’s Action Santa Cruz at actionsantacruz.com—PayPal donations go through Bank of America and Bay Federal. Of course, there are always fundraisers. So, maybe this is the perfect ivitation to consider taking one on. So, don’t be shy—create a relief fundraiser of your own. I noticed The Last Resort Salon recently held a “cut-a-thon.” Brilliant. Be sure to continue alerting us here at GT about your fundraising endeavors for Haiti ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ).

Meanwhile, that Desal plant is creating a stir (see letters.)

And don’t forget: the unveiling of Three Princes Plaque is 11:30 a.m. Friday, April 9 at Lighthouse Point.

What’s left? Good times. Try to have some this week.


Greg Archer | Editor-in-Chief


Letters to Good Times Editor

Look At This Way…
Is Tom Honig channeling Karl Rove? (GT 3/31). His recent column on Arana Gulch is either a bad attempt at framing the story into something provocative (environmentalist vs. environmentalist) or else he’s woefully misinformed. Where to start?
It’s the NIMBYs: No. If Mr. Honig had done his homework, he’d learn that people opposing the project come from all over the city and county. In addition, one of the most vocal opponents is the California Native Plant Society, a statewide organization whose mission is to protect California's native plant heritage and preserve it for future generations. Hardly NIMBYs.
All bicyclists support the Broadway-Brommer bikepath: No. Read the comments from the public. Many cyclists have spoken out, aghast that cycling access is being used to undercut the Endangered Species Act. The Santa Cruz tarplant is a federally threatened and California-endangered species.
The Broadway-Brommer Bikepath project can protect the tarplant: No. In the EIR the city admits that the bikepath will create damage that cannot be mitigated. They have no solution. Instead, if the city is allowed to build this bikepath, they promise to manage the remaining tarplant habitat better than they have to date. For years residents have been asking the city to manage this critical habitat. Now the city is offering to play catch-up on their existing responsibility and considers this some type of “mitigation.” It’s not.
The Broadway-Brommer Bikepath is the only option: No. When I first heard about this project in 1999, cyclists complained that there were no bikelanes on nearby Soquel Avenue. Now there are. (There's also an expensive, right-turn-lane from Soquel onto Capitola Avenue.) For years the California Coastal Commission staff has asked the city to look at alternative bikepaths that don’t bisect the tarplant habitat. They have many specific suggestions: First, improve bikelanes on the Murray Street Bridge (this will soon be a reality, when that bridge undergoes an earthquake retrofit). Second, they recommend the Rail Trail, another path that’s coming closer to fruition. Third, they recommend a bikepath from Frederick Street Park. When Ed Porter was on the city council, he investigated this option and showed it was better for the environment, significantly cheaper to build and maintain, and added only one to two minutes to a cyclist’s commute.
The Broadway-Brommer Bikepath is good for the economy. No. This project will cost about $4 million to build. To help finance it, the Santa Cruz County Transportation Commission will allocate 100 percent of its funding for two straight years, just to pay a portion of the construction costs. Huh? Our municipalities are broke. There are many problems that have higher priority than this one expensive project. During these cash-strapped times, we need to focus on transportation projects that will deliver more bang for the buck and benefit more residents throughout the county.
All conscientious environmentalists must agree that it’s a bad idea to pave over the habitat of an endangered species. A smart choice for all concerned would be to plan the bikepath from Frederick Street Park.   It's time for bicyclists, environmentalists, and the city to be united on a smart route, one we can all support. We can improve cycling access without destroying the environment.  
Patti Jazanoski
Santa Cruz

Desal Disappointment
Regarding the recent articles on the Desal Plant, I think it’s totatlly a bad idea. This would really suck. The energy it would take to generate this project just would not be worth it in the end. Think about it—why can’t we just conserve water more? We already waste so much of it, anyway. We live in Santa Cruz, for crying out loud. Why aren’t more people up in arms about this?
Jason Anderson
Santa Cruz

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

You Are What You Post

Online personality algorithms put astrological profiles to shame, but UCSC psychologists are raising questions about sharing personal data

 

Venus Direct, Mercury Retro Soon, Honoring Our Labors

As Burning Man (nine days, Aug. 30-Sept. 7 in the sign of Virgo) burns in the hot white desert sands, a petal of the rose created by retrograde Venus and the twelve-petaled Sun in Virgo’s petals unfold. All of us are on the burning ground (Leo) in the womb (cave of the heart) of the mother (Virgo), gestating for humanity once again (each year) a new state of consciousness. Both Virgo and Cancer, feminine (receptive energies) signs, are from our last solar system (Pleiades). When humanity first appeared on Earth we were nurtured by the mother, a matriarchy of energies (on islands in the Pacific). Eve, Isis and Mary are part of the lineages of our ancient Mother. Overseen by the Pleiades, the Earth (matter, mater, the mother) in that last solar system was imbued with intelligence (Ray 3). As we move toward autumn, another mother, Ceres realizes she has mere weeks left with her beloved daughter, Persephone. Persimmon and pomegranate trees prepare for autumn, their colors signs of hope as the light each day continues to dim. Sunday, Venus in Leo turns stationary direct, yet continues in her shadow until Oct. 9 (when retrograde Mercury turns direct). Slowly our newly assessed values emerge from the Venus retrograde. We thought in Venus retro how to use our resources more effectively. Mercury retrogrades Sept. 17. Monday is Labor Day. Let us honor the labor of everyone, all life a “labor.” Let us honor Labor Day and all those who have “served” (labored for) us this past year. We honor their labors. We honor the labor of our parents, those who have loved us. We honor our own labors, too. We are all in service, we are all laboring. We are all valuable.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Girl Gone Wild

’70s SF recalled in raw, poignant ‘Diary of a Teenage Girl’
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Sushi Garden

Local sushi empire expands to Scotts Valley

 

Do you overshare online?

I don’t think so. I just post things about my life, like successful things. Sometimes I just like sharing different news that I find interesting, or favorite artists, clothes, music. I like to post photos. Natalia Delgado, Santa Cruz, Server

 

McIntyre Vineyards

I recently met up with three friends for dinner at Sanderlings at Seascape Beach Resort. We chose to eat outside so we could watch the sun set over the ocean, but the Aptos fog rolled in and swallowed it up.

 

Sustainable Supper

The Homeless Garden Project’s Sustain Supper series supports its award-winning programs