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Youth at the Helm

news2Meet 23-year-old Kirk Lacob, general manager for the Santa Cruz Warriors

Kirk Lacob, the 23-year-old general manager of the Warriors' Development League team that will soon make Santa Cruz its new home, will commute to work from his home in the Marina District of San Francisco. He proposed the idea for a team helicopter to make the 75-mile commute south, but the Warriors' finance department wasn't having it, Lacob says.

It was worth a try.

Lacob is the son of Joe Lacob, the co-owner of the Golden State Warriors, and he's enjoying the benefits of knowing the right people after college. He was promoted about a month ago from director of basketball operations for the Golden State Warriors to the team's assistant general manager. Now he will also spend much of his time in Santa Cruz establishing the Warriors' D-League affiliate team, which is moving from North Dakota.

Lacob grew up in Woodside, Calif., went to Menlo School and graduated from Stanford University in 2010. He was a walk-on player for a short time during his freshman year at Stanford and ran the university's club basketball program during his sophomore year, which he says taught him a lot about heading up an organization. He earned his university degree in Science Technology in Society, but says he considers his actual major to simply be “basketball.”

“My dream has always been to either run a basketball team or start a company,” Lacob says. “And I feel like I'm doing both at the same time.”

Although he now finds himself on the business side of sports, he says he still plays basketball often with two leagues: one in San Francisco and another farther south on the peninsula. About twice a month Lacob goes to San Quentin State Prison, where he and a group of friends are authorized to play basketball against inmates. He also sometimes plays with the Golden State Warriors’ General Manager Bob Myers and other staff members at the team's practice court in Oakland.

While part of what appeals to Lacob in working with D-League players is helping them to achieve their athletic goals, his position with the team is also geared to help him develop as a general manager, he says. He is also interested in managing the D-League for its potential to become more popular among fans.

The D-League was established in 2001 to develop talent across all disciplines, including athletic trainers, coaches and front office executives, according to NBA.com.

The league is becoming an increasingly respected proving ground, according to Lacob. “As of earlier this summer, 25 percent of all NBA players had D-league experience,” he says. “This really shows that we have a true minor league system forming.”

There are currently 16 D-League teams, 10 of which are affiliated with an NBA team, he says. Lacob speculates that within a couple of years, all 30 NBA teams will have their own affiliates. “What we've tried to do is be a pioneer of this model,” he says.

Lacob notes that his Silicon Valley mentality is a big asset to him in his role as general manager, adding that he has the same innovative, competitive and enthusiastic approach to building something new as the young people working in the tech industry.

There was some initial doubt about moving the Golden State Warriors' D-League team to Santa Cruz, but Lacob is confident in the decision.  “I like building things,” Lacob says, “and when people tell you something can't be done, there's a grain in my body that wants to prove them wrong. I like defying [the] odds.”

He's also got the support of some of the top basketball executives in the business.

On the morning of Tuesday, June 12, Lacob and NBA hall-of-famer Jerry “Mr. Clutch” West, who is 74, drove from Oakland to Santa Cruz for a promotional meet-and-greet lunch with City of Santa Cruz officials, NBA executives and local business owners at the Crow's Nest restaurant.

The Warriors’ Vice President of New Franchise Development, Jim Weyermann, announced a sponsorship from Kaiser Permanente, which names the soon-to-be-built facility for the Santa Cruz Warriors the “Kaiser Permanente Arena.”

Lacob also took the opportunity to unveil the new Santa Cruz Warriors’ logo, which he designed. Reminiscent of the Golden State Warriors' bridge design, the logo has a yellow circle with a blue trident in its middle and reads, “SANTA CRUZ WARRIORS” around the circle's bottom.

“We came up with this three pronged approach,” he says. “The trident is a symbol of toughness—a warrior. It's also a nautical symbol. And third, it looks like a W. We were happy to put those three elements together and create something that showed a unique Santa Cruz approach but also had a Warriors feel to it.”

During the June 12 meet-and-greet, the audience on the second floor of the Crow's Nest gave Jerry West, who is on the Warriors' executive board, their full attention.

“I think you'll be pleasantly surprised by the professionalism of these young players,” West told the crowd. “They're here to prove a point. You're going to be surprised when you see how competitive these kids are.”

For his part, Lacob says he is also excited to have the opportunity to work in Santa Cruz.

“For the first time I can tell people I've got to go to Santa Cruz this weekend,” he laughs. “They're forcing me to go, where I hang out by the beach and watch basketball. Life won't be too bad.”

Comments (5)Add Comment
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written by a guest, June 20, 2012
Really well written article! Can't Wait for the D-league to show up, its really going to help out the city in so many ways!
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written by a guest, June 19, 2012
The respect for the league continues to grow and hopefully it continues to expand to 30 teams. I can't wait to go to Santa Cruz Warriors games and watch the progression of the players. It will be exciting to see some of them go on to the next level as well. And it's great that the Santa Cruz community finally has a professional sports team that they can call their own.
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written by a guest, June 19, 2012
Young kids are increasingly deciding to go play overseas rather than go to college. While I don't agree with skipping a chance to play in college, the D-league could potentially be an alternative to these players going overseas which would at least keep the talent over here.
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written by a guest, June 19, 2012
The D-league also allows for NBA teams to develop their project players who are too raw to go straight to the league. There are so many players who have the physical tools to be good but haven't mastered the fundamentals. With a few years in a minor league system they can develop the skills necessary to compete at the highest level. For example, the warriors have 4 picks in the upcoming draft but most likely only two of them will make the NBA roster, so the Santa Cruz Warriors allows them to keep the others under contract and develop them in the D-league.
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written by a guest, June 19, 2012
The D-league is great for the sport of basketball. With only 15 roster spots per NBA team, it is very hard for players to make it into the league without playing at a major school. The D-league finally gives those not-so-recognized players or late bloomers a chance to be noticed and eventually make it to an NBA team.

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Heart Me Up

In defense of Valentine’s Day

 

“be(ing) of love (a little) more careful”—e.e. cummings

Wednesday (Feb. 10) is Ash Wednesday, when Lent begins. Friday (Feb. 12) is Lincoln’s 207th birthday. Sunday is Valentine’s Day. On Ash Wednesday, with foreheads marked with a cross of ashes, we hear the words, “From dust thou art and unto dust thou shalt return.” Reminding us that our bodies, made of matter, will remain here on Earth when we are called back. It is our Soul that will take us home again. Lent offers us 40 days and nights of purification in preparation for the Resurrection (Easter) festival (an initiation) and for the Three Spring Festivals (at the time of the full moon)—Aries, Taurus, Gemini. The New Group of World Servers have been preparing since Winter Solstice. The number 40 is significant. The Christ (Pisces World Teacher) was in the desert for 40 days and 40 nights prior to His three-year ministry. The purpose of this desert exile was to prepare his Archangel (light) body to withstand the pressures of the Earth plane (form and matter). We, too, in our intentional purifications and prayers during the 40 days of Lent, prepare ourselves (physical body, emotions, lower mind) to receive and be able to withstand the irradiation of will, love/wisdom and light streaming into the Earth at spring equinox, Easter, and the Three Spiritual Festivals. What is Lent? The Anglo-Saxon word, lencten, comes from an ancient spring festival, agricultural rites marking the transition between winter and summer. The seasons reflect changes in nature (physical world) and humanity responds with social festivals of gratitude and of renewal. There is a purification process, prayerfulness in nature and in humanity in preparation for a great flow of spiritual energies during springtime. Valentine’s Day: Aquarius Sun, Taurus moon. Let us offer gifts of comfort, ease, harmony, beauty and satisfaction. Things chocolate and golden. Venus and Taurus things.

 

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