Santa Cruz Good Times

Wednesday
Oct 01st
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Rev. Rochelle Knight, Officiant

Rev.RochelleKnight,Officiant1"I do” isn’t the hard part.

Finding someone to usher you along on that white wedding day is where couples can sometimes get stumped. Say he’s a Buddhist and she’s a Christian. What then? Who marries them? For some lovebirds, it’s an easy decision. But for those in a quandary, here’s an easy answer: Meet Rev. Rochelle Knight.

“Sometimes they’re not religious, or one is, and the other is different, or their families are religious and they want to please both of their traditions,” Knight says. “I help guide the couple.”

This reverend is as untraditional as many of the couples that come to her for assistance. For an officiant, she’s young—only 36, with three children, and a husband of nearly nine years. Plus she has a varied spiritual past: Knight was raised as a Jehovah’s Witness, she meditates, has studied Tibetan Buddhism and was a student of Risa D’Angeles (GT’s favorite astrologer). This mish-mash of religions and spirituality provide Knight with a wealth of knowledge on how to officiate at weddings, especially when working with inter-faith, quasi-religious, or non-religious couples.

Hers is a unique approach: She learns how to speak each couple’s language, and works with them to develop a dynamic and personal wedding ceremony that satisfies both the bride and groom.

For $500, a couple can enlist the help of this reverend, who will meet with them several times before the big day, go through a questionnaire with them and ensure that their wedding day will go off perfectly, including hitting on the six “musts” for each ceremony.

The invocation, which is often a prayer, or for non-religious couples “there are other ways to invoke Spirit without directly using those terms or those words,” Knight says; the address, where Knight talks to the guests who are gathered and discusses why they are there, and what they are about to witness; a creative element, such as a poem or song, provides a soothing segue into the heart of the ceremony—the vows. Finally, she guides the couple in exchanging rings and lastly she offers a blessing to their union and reminds them, “that they can be stronger together than they are apart.”

It’s simple—a piece of cake. Well, actually, probably finding the wedding cake is much more difficult than working with Knight. This non-denominational reverend has an affable personality and she emits positivity.

In the course of spending an hour with Knight in her cozy home office in the Aptos Hills, she mentions numerous times how personal the wedding is. “It’s your day, make it yours,” she says. “That’s what I’m all about and why I’m here—to empower people to create a day that truly represents who they are.”

Rev.RochelleKnight,Officiant2In a sleek binder in her office is a selection of the 50 or so weddings that she has performed. Couples can flip through the paperwork and find a ceremony whose elements they connect with. They can bring their own ideas, or Knight will provide the old faithful—a basic simple ceremony. Cobbling together all these different elements usually culminates in one-of-a-kind weddings. “This is a totally customized approach with very little outline or expectation,” she says.

So what is to be expected? A smooth wedding that will take anywhere from 15 to 30 minutes. Knight will also supply the marriage certificate. But don’t expect her to plan the entire day; that’s up to a wedding coordinator or someone you’ve nominated to be in charge of that day, which by the way, Knight recommends.

But what’s the ultimate expectation that a couple can get from working with Knight? A celebration of their love. “I feel that the universe works in mysterious ways, and if you’re brought together, you’re usually destined to find out the reason why,” she says.

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Reflecting Glass

Composer Philip Glass’ first trip to Big Sur was by motorcycle; little did he know that he’d establish a music festival there six decades later.

 

Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, occurs this year during Libra, the sign of creating right relations with all aspects life and with earth’s kingdoms. We contemplate (the Libra meditation) forgiveness, which means, “to give for another.” Forgiveness is not pardon. It’s a sacrifice (fire in the heart, giving from the heart). Forgiveness is giving up for the good of the other. This is the law of evolution (the path of return).

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of September 26

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Wurst Case Scenario

Venus Spirits releases agave spirit, Renee Shepherd on planting garlic, Sausagefest 2014, and wine harvest in full swing

 

Do you think you are addicted to technology?

Santa Cruz  |  Unemployed

 

Best of Santa Cruz County

The 2013 Santa Cruz County Readers' Poll and Critics’ Picks It’s our biggest issue of the year, and in it, your votes—more than 6,500 of them—determined the winners of The Best of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll. New to the long list of local restaurants, shops and other notables that captured your interest: Best Beer Selection, Best Locally Owned Business, Best Customer Service and Best Marijuana Dispensary. In the meantime, many readers were ever so chatty online about potential new categories. Some of the suggestions that stood out: Best Teen Program and Best Web Design/Designer. But what about: Dog Park, Church, Hotel, Local Farm, Therapist (I second that!) or Sports Bar—not to be confused with Bra. Our favorite suggestion: Best Act of Kindness—one reader noted Café Gratitude and the free meals it offered to the Santa Cruz Police Department in the aftermath of recent crimes. Perhaps some of these can be woven into next year’s ballot, so stay tuned. In the meantime, enjoy the following pages and take note of our Critics’ Picks, too, beginning on page 91. A big thanks for voting—and for reading—and an even bigger congratulations to all of the winners. Enjoy.  -Greg Archer, EditorBest of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll INDEX

 

Apricot Wine for Dessert

Thomas Kruse Winery, a participant in the new Santa Clara Wine Trail, has been around for a long time—since 1971, to be exact. When our little group arrived to try some wine at the Kruses’ low-key tasting room, Thomas Kruse and his wife Karen were there to greet us. Theirs is a small operation, and they’re proud to offer quality wine at affordable prices. “Because we are small and low-tech, it’s easy to relate to the whole winemaking process,” says Karen—and the Kruses take pride in making wine “just like it has been made for centuries.”