Santa Cruz Good Times

Saturday
Apr 19th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

UCSC Demonstrations Escalate

news_walkoutWalkout draws hundreds, protestors occupy campus building
Hundreds of UC Santa Cruz students, faculty, workers, and alumni gathered at the base of campus on Thursday, Sept. 24 to protest devastating budget cuts that have taken place over the summer. The daylong event, coinciding with the first day of classes at UCSC, also included a strike by the union of University Professional and Technical Employees (UPTE) and a sympathy strike by the clerical worker’s union, the Coalition of University Employees.

 

The day culminated in a surprise occupation of a building in UCSC’s quarry plaza.

The day’s events included speeches by union representatives, faculty members, Assemblymember Bill Monning, and a performance by the Raging Grannies. Speakers addressed the crowd through a bicycle-powered sound system provided by People Power, a local sustainable transportation advocacy group.

Computer Science graduate student Foaad Khosmood marveled at the event’s cross-boundary coalitions. “State leaders and the UC Regents have little appreciation of what drastic cuts these are. Things can’t be business as usual,” he says.  

Johanna Isaacson, a UCSC lecturer who is teaching a frosh “core course” at College Nine this fall, held class at the base of campus. “The students were excited,” she says, noting that this was their very first experience in a college class. “I want them to understand the issues at stake.” After listening to testimonials from union members, Isaacson’s students each interviewed a walkout participant to better understand the demonstrators’ motives.

“They were all very worried,” says Isaacson. “If there are more tuition hikes these students may very well have to leave the University.”


Professor Dana Frank, a UCSC labor historian, spoke about the unprecedented nature of the gathering. “This is a historical moment in the history of the University of California. This has never happened before,” she said.  “We’ve had enough of the disrespect. Guess what? The deal is off in every way. We are part of a new university – one that is controlled from below.”


Victor Sanchez, president of the UC Student Association, also imparted a sense of the struggle to come. “These are just the first steps,” he told the crowd. “It needs to escalate.” In the afternoon, a group initiated occupation of a building at UCSC’s quarry plaza. An open letter describing the action is in circulation. “A single day of action at the university is not enough because we cannot afford to return to business as usual,” it states.

“As undergraduates, graduate students, faculty, and staff, we call on everyone at the UC to support this occupation by continuing the walkouts and strikes into tomorrow, the next day, and for the indefinite future,” reads the letter. “We call on the people of California to occupy and escalate.”
Please visit http://occupyca.wordpress.com for up-to-date information on the UCSC building occupation.

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Cardinal Grand Cross in the Sky

Following Holy Week (passion, death and burial of the Pisces World Teacher) and Easter Sunday (Resurrection Festival), from April 19 to the 23, the long-awaited and discussed Cardinal Cross of Change appears in the sky, composed of Cardinal signs Aries, Libra, Cancer, and Capricorn, with planets (13-14 degrees) Uranus (in Aries), Jupiter (in Cancer), Mars (in Libra) and Pluto (in Capricorn), an actual geometrical square or cross configuration. Cardinal signs mark the seasons of change, initiating new realities.

 

Sugar: The New Tobacco?

Proposed bill would require warning labels on sugary drinks Will soda and other saccharine libations soon come with a health warning? They will if it’s up to our state senator, Bill Monning (D-Carmel). On Feb. 27, Monning proposed first-of-its-kind legislation that would require a consumer warning label be placed on sugar-sweetened beverages sold in California. SB 1000, also known as the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Safety Warning Act, was proposed to provide vital information to consumers about the harmful effects of consuming sugary drinks, such as sodas, sports drinks, energy drinks, and sweetened teas.

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of April 17

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >

 

Growing Hope

Campos Seguros combats sexual assault in the Watsonville farmworker community Farm work was a way of life for Rocio Camargo, who grew up in Watsonville as the daughter of Mexican immigrants. Her parents met while working the fields 30 years ago, and her father went on to run Fuentes Berry Farms.
Sign up for Tomorrow's Good Times Today
Upcoming arts & events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Foodie File: Red Apple Cafe

Breakfast takes center stage at Gracia Krakauer's Red Apple Cafe Before they moved to Aptos, Gracia and her husband Dan Krakauer would visit friends in Santa Cruz County and eat at the Red Apple Café all the time. Then they moved up here from Santa Monica five years ago, and bought the Aptos location (there’s a separate one in Watsonville) from the family who owned it for two decades.

 

How would you feel about a tech industry boom in Santa Cruz?

I feel like it would ruin the small old-town feeling of Santa Cruz. It wouldn’t be the same Surf City kind of vacation town that it is. Antoinette BennettSanta Cruz | Construction Management

 

Trout Gulch Vineyards

Cinsault 2012—la grande plage diurne The most popular wines on store shelves are those most generally known and available—Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, which are all superb for sure. But when you come across a more unusual varietal, like Trout Gulch Vineyards’ Cinsault ($18), it opens up a whole new world.

 

Waddell Creek, Al Fresco

Route One Summer Farm Dinner You’ve been buying their insanely fresh produce for years now at farmers’ markets. Right? So now why not become more familiar with the gorgeous Waddell Creek farmlands of Route One Farms?