Santa Cruz Good Times

Friday
Dec 19th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Tumbling Tots

news_2Three Santa Cruz preschool co-ops fight to remain open
On Tuesday, May 18, uncertainty filled the classroom as the parents of Soquel Parent Education Nursery School (Soquel PENS) congregated for their last monthly parent meeting of the school year—and what might be their last meeting ever.

Soquel PENS is a preschool co-op with two sister schools, Westside PENS (WPENS) and Santa Cruz PENS (SCPENS). The schools have been a part of the Santa Cruz community for decades, ranging from 35 years to 61 years in operation. “There are grandmothers that went there before their daughters. And now their daughters’ daughters are going there,” says Matthew Kirk-Williams, father of 4-year-old Logan, who attends Soquel PENS.

Today, all three schools are struggling to remain open for a future generation of children. In the past, the schools received funding from the state as part of the Adult Education Program, which was based on parents’ attendance in the classroom. But faced with a $5.2 million deficit, the Santa Cruz City School Board decided on March 3 to cut every program in Adult Education. This included eliminating funding for the three PENS schools. The seven teachers at WPENS, SCPENS, and Soquel PENS received their pink slips earlier this month.

Facing closure, the parents and teachers are fighting to keep their schools open through fundraising efforts. For many months, the Santa Cruz City School Board reassured teachers and parents that despite the cuts, preschools would remain untouched. “Many of us felt misled and intimidated,” Susie O’Hara, WPENS parent and head of the fundraising committee, told Good Times via e-mail. “Now we have to try to raise 200 grand with two weeks left in the school year. It has been truly devastating to our community of parents.”

Soquel PENS and its sister schools are not simply an unloading dock for children as parents rush off to work, nor are the schools bent on manufacturing prodigy children. Parents enroll in the city’s Adult Education Program and come once a week to assist the teacher in the classroom and learn more about their children as they begin to interact with and make sense of the world.

“Our program gives parents the stability to stay in touch with their kids,” says Kimberly Woodland, who has been teaching at Soquel PENS for four years and is affectionately referred to by both the students and the parents as Teacher Kim.

For Kirk-Williams, the children aren’t the only ones learning in the classroom. “We’re all learning to be the parents we want to be, finding out what works, what doesn’t work,” he says. “You don’t find this learning experience anywhere else.”

Evoking the meaning of “it takes a village to raise a child,” parents learn how to not only raise their own children, but others as well. “It’s the closest thing I have in my life to a village,” says Marika Riggs, Soquel PENS parent and president of Soquel PENS’ board. “Our kids need so much growing up, and they get to have relationships with so many different adults who are great parents.” With an average classroom ratio of one adult for every three kids, each child’s needs are individually met with ample attention. Parents and teachers encourage self-discovery by engaging the children in various activities that range from arts and crafts and science experiments to dress-up and story telling. “Children learn through play. There’s a lot of freedom to explore,” says Nancy Samsel, who has been at Soquel PENS for eight years, where she goes by Teacher Nancy.

“We have the ability to start our kids off this way at the preschool level and help them have a better experience, which sets their whole tone,” says Lisa, Logan Kirk-Williams’ mother. “They decide something about themselves when they’re in school. And I’ve seen the kids who decide ‘education is going to be something great in my life,’ and I’ve seen the kids who decided it isn’t.” In light of the budget cuts to education, the parents fear that more kids will fall in the latter category.

“It just seems like there’s a lot of other places you could cut,” says Lisa. “It’s a little over $50,000 in operation costs for a whole preschool. We do our own janitorial. We buy our own supplies. We run the board. That’s why it’s cheap and we want to keep it cheap.”

To keep their schools open and affordable for the next school year, they hope to raise $200,000 in their ongoing fundraising campaign. They are sending letters out to past alumni, and have also received a matching grant from an anonymous donor. In addition, they hope to sell 5,000 tickets for a car raffle, which will generate half of the money the need to stay open.

If they are able to raise enough money to remain open for next year, they will start a grant- writing committee, which they hope will sustain their community for the following years.

Back at the meeting, Logan is bouncing from the lap of one parent to another. A baby is being held and coddled by various parents as they watch a slideshow of the past school year. It shows photos of kids face-painting parents, school outings to a farm, Teacher Kim at story time, and Teacher Nancy animating her puppets. Many parents are teary-eyed as they reflect upon another year that has come and gone, and the incredibly transient nature of childhood. And then there is the hovering sadness that this might be a more permanent end—that this place might really be gone for good. “This place gave our kids what we couldn’t see, what we didn’t even know they needed,” remarks one parent. “It gave us a foundation that’s going to stay with me forever.”

Comments (3)Add Comment
Teacher/parent
written by Tina McGlashan, May 27, 2010
These 3 Parent Education Nursery Schools are helping raise BOTH children AND parents. I am a K/1st grade teacher in Santa Cruz and couldn't be more impressed with the WPENS program my daughter and I participated in this year. A quality program, proven to be treasured by our community over the past 35-60 years deserves the efforts underway to keep them open, even in light of severe budget cuts.
As a WPENS parent working on fundraising, I can say that we have a solid plan underway to keep the 3 PENS open for the next year as we create a long-term, sustainability plan. The grant writing committee has ALREADY begun working. Our generous donor that is leading the community challenge of matching funds is evidence of the commitment to these programs. We will be reaching out to our past alumni for support over the summer and fall with the belief that our community values these programs and is willing to do what it takes to keep them into the next generation-- our community treasures it, our parents need it, our kids deserve it.
Difficult choices
written by KSC, May 26, 2010
The PENS programs are wonderful - no question about that. It's the State of California that cut the funds for these programs. To keep them fully funded, the school board would have to take money away from the K-12 schools. As a parent in those schools, I support prioritizing the elementary, middle and high schools. The PENS programs can stay alive through a combination of fundraising and charging fees. These are not viable options for the public schools. The budget crisis is profound in the impact on our communities. Please right to our elected officials in Sacramento to pass a budget that fully funds our schools AND supports valuable programs like PENS and Adult Ed
...
written by CathyL, May 25, 2010
I wish you the best in your fund raising. Your program is a very important part of our community. Dealing with the SCCS district is not fun now a days. Hang in there!!! smilies/wink.gif

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Is This a Dream?

A beginner’s guide to understanding and exploring the uncanny world of lucid dreams

 

Giving and Giving, Then Giving Some More

2014 is almost over. Wednesday, Dec. 17, the Jewish Festival of Light, Hanukkah, begins. We are in our last week of Sag and last two weeks of December. Sunday, Dec. 21 is winter Solstice, as the sun enters Capricorn (3:30 p.m. for the west coast). Soon after, the Capricorn new moon occurs (5:36 p.m. for the west coast)—the last new moon of 2014. Sunday morning Uranus in Aries (revolution, revelation) is stationary direct (retro since July 22). Uranus/Aries create things new and needed to anchor the new culture and civilization (Aquarius). We will see revolutionary change in 2015. Capricorn new moon, building-the-personality seed thought, is, “Let ambition rule and let the door to initiation and freedom stand wide (open).” Capricorn is a gate—where matter returns to spirit. But the gate is unseen until the Ajna Center (third eye), Diamond Light of Direction, opens. Winter solstice is the longest day of darkness of the year. The sun’s rays resting at the Tropic of Capricorn (southern hemisphere) symbolize the Christ (soul’s) light piercing the heart of the Earth, remaining there for three days, till Holy Night (midnight Thursday morning). Then the sun’s light begins to rise. It is the birth of the new light (holy child) for the world. A deep calm and stillness pervades the world.The entire planet is revivified, re-spiritualized. All hearts beating reflect this Light. And so throughout the Earth there’s a radiant “impress” (impressions, pictures) given to humanity of the World Mother and her Child. The star Sirius (love/direction) and the constellation Virgo the mother shines above. For gift giving, give to those in need. Give and give and then give some more. This creates the new template of giving and sharing for the new world.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Stocking Stuffers

The men behind the women of the Kinsey Sicks Dragapella Beautyshop Quartet explain their own special brand of ‘dragtivism,’ and their holiday show at the Rio
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Tramonti Pizza

Why there’s no such thing as too much Italian food in Seabright

 

Guitar or surfboard?

Guitar. The closest thing I ever came to surfing was sliding down a rock hill. Charlie Tweddle, Santa Cruz, Hats and Music

 

Fortino Winery’s Intriguing Charbono

At the opening celebration of the new Santa Clara Wine Trail in August, one of the wineries we visited was Fortino. This is where I first tasted their intriguing estate-grown Charbono—a varietal that is one of the rarest in California, with only 80 acres grown statewide.

 

Beyond the Jar

How Tabitha Stroup has built her rapidly expanding jam empire