Santa Cruz Good Times

Wednesday
Oct 22nd
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

The Track of the Quake: Loma Prieta Turns 20

cover04goodtimes-sAn Evening of Commemoration and Reflection

Where were YOU at 5:04?

At 5:04 p.m. on Oct. 17, 1989 the Loma Prieta Earthquake ripped through the forested canyon of Aptos Creek, snapping trees, throwing boulders and opening fissures across the landscape.  This wasn’t the first time the Aptos canyon had been torn loose by an earthquake.  On April 18, 1906, the north side of the canyon wall collapsed, hurling trees down the mountainside and blocking the creek for weeks. 1906 and then 1989.  Have we learned anything?  Did the 1989 earthquake modify our behavior in any significant way?   Do you do anything differently because of that earthquake?  Are we any closer to being able to predict earthquakes here in California?  And what about the scars scratched into our psyches?  Have they healed?  From this lofty perspective 20 years later, knowing what you know now, would you have done anything differently before Oct. 17, 1989?  And after?  See all Loma Prieta earthquake articles in the Santa Cruz History section >

Have we learned anything?  This event hopes to answer that question, covering such topics, from the scientific to the most personal with photographs, rare video, cutting edge work being done on earthquake prediction and a gathering of survivors. Presenters Include:

 

Sandy Lydon Coordinator and Master of Ceremonies.  Historian Emeritus, Cabrillo College. A historian with a special interest in the Forest of Nisene Marks, Lydon was one of the first people to visit the earthquake’s epicenter deep inside the forest.  He has written widely on the subject of the region’s earthquake history, and has visited the site of the largest modern natural disaster, the Great Tangshan Earthquake in China that killed an estimated 400,000 people on July 28, 1976.  He makes an annual personal pilgrimage to the Loma Prieta epicenter every year in October.  His home is 1.8 miles southwest of the earthquake’s epicenter.


Gary Griggs Professor of Earth and Planetary Science, Director of the Institute of Marine Science, University of California at Santa Cruz—Griggs has written and spoken widely on the geology and seismology of Central California and co-lead with Lydon a trip to Tangshan, China.  Lydon and Griggs bring a unique style to their presentations, and together they will provide some unusual perspectives on the earthquake.  Lydon and Griggs led an expedition to the 1989 epicenter area on the 15th anniversary and plan to do so again on the 20th.


Robley Levy  Past Santa Cruz County Supervisor, Second District—Levy was on the Board of Supervisors representing the Epicenter District (2nd district) on Oct. 17, 1989.  She will share her observations about the governmental response to the earthquake—including FEMA—and also give some insights about how well the county was prepared in 1989 and how it might be prepared today.

QuakeFinder, Inc. A representative from QuakeFinder, Inc., a private company based in Palo Alto currently working on short-term earthquake forecasting will make a presentation of their cutting-edge research.  QuakeFinder is monitoring Ultra Low Frequency magnetic radiation as well as infrared luminescence, and in several instances have found correlations between them and subsequence earthquakes.  They use both ground-based instrumentation as well as satellite monitors (satellites that they placed in orbit independently). QuakeFinder recently placed an electromagnetic monitoring station on the east side of the Pajaro Valley, very near the San Andreas Fault.

Other Special Guests and Loma Prieta survivors Lydon and Griggs will be joined by some surprise guests and speakers, and they would encourage anyone with stories to tell about their experiences of the ’89 earthquake in and around Aptos to contact them.


INFO: 7-10 p.m. Friday, Oct.16, 2009, Cabrillo College, Erica Schilling Forum, Room 450, Aptos. Tickets: $25 prior to the event:  $30 at the door. A portion of the proceeds will go to the Friends of Santa Cruz State Parks.
Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Field Work

Santa Cruz Mountain winemakers explain how the harvest works, and what kind of wine to expect from this year's crop

 

Libra's Two Choices

Libra (our last week) is the sign of creating right relations and values. In Libra we are asked to choose how to be, our identity in the world. We can maintain a hermetic sealed-off attitude (my life, my work, my money, etc.) or we can gain knowledge of world events and learn more about those in need. Libra is a group sign—self with others. Here are some events occurring in our world this week concerning food, poverty, spirituality, values and global realities. The UN (a spiritual experiment) each month places a “light” upon world problems. This week a light shines on Rural Women, Farms, Food & Poverty. Before we choose to respond we must have knowledge. “So we can each do our part.” Oct. 15 - International Day of Rural Women (unrecognized with few resources); Oct. 16 - World Food Day & Family Farming: Feeding the World, Caring for the Earth; Oct. 17 - Eradication of Poverty Day (international). During the month of Libra (with Saturn exalted), we pause, contemplate and assess what it is we know, don’t know, and need to know. Libra receives and distributes Ray 3 of divine intelligence, right relations, right choice and right economy (Venus). Use your intelligence “tips the Libran scales” in terms of being able to see and then choose between the two paths Libra offers (return to the past or step forward into Scorpio’s Discipleship). Libra (the oscillating light) prepares us for the great tests and conflicts in Scorpio. In Libra we are subtly tested as we learn the nature of polarized energies (s/he loves me, s/he loves me not). In Libra we learn more about ourselves through others. Libra’s Ray 3 asks us to become more adaptable and skillful. And then we are to teach each other what we know. In Libra, we all become teachers. In all these ways love is cultivated.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Docs Without Borders

United Nations Association Film Festival showcases documentaries from around the globe
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Nut Kreations

Co-owner Craig Olsen goes nuts over nuts

 

What artist or artists participating in the encore weekend of Open Studios should not be missed?

Santa Cruz | Teacher

 

Martin Ranch Winery

Friends who are wine club members of Martin Ranch invited us to the winery’s fun and festive annual barbecue, where the wine is flowing and the food just keeps on coming. Music and dancing are part and parcel of the action, and a good time is guaranteed.

 

Beer Bus

Santa Cruz’s new Brew Cruz, award winning ales, mole by el Jardín, and Wildcat Ridge Chardonnay