Santa Cruz Good Times

Saturday
Apr 19th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Occupy Update

news occupyJudge dismisses charges against four of the Santa Cruz 11

“I’m so happy,” declared Grant Wilson at the Santa Cruz County Courthouse the morning of Wednesday, April 25. 

Wilson and three co-defendants had just attended their second day of pre-trial hearings to face charges of trespassing, vandalism and felony conspiracy stemming from the Nov. 30, 2011 occupation of a vacant Downtown Santa Cruz bank. Santa Cruz Superior Court Judge Paul Burdick told a courtroom full of supporters and observers that he was dismissing all charges against Wilson and the three co-defendants, Franklin Alcantara, Edward Rector and Cameron Laurendau. Witnesses inside the courtroom say that Burdick told the prosecution, “you paint with too broad a brush,” and that insufficient evidence had been presented to show that any of the four had intended to “commit trespass by design.”

“It was spectacular,” Wilson said. “The judge said that the assistant DA had not shown any evidence that any of us had committed any vandalism, or that any of us had been there other than [for] a short period of time in daylight hours on Nov. 30, when the building was first occupied.”

Becky Johnson, another one of the 11 people charged by the Santa Cruz District Attorney in this case, was on the scene and observed the dismissal. “Pinch me—this must be a dream,” she told GT just minutes after the charges were dismissed. “I’ve been watching these courtrooms for years and I haven’t seen anything like this. I would call it justice.”

Johnson is scheduled for a preliminary hearing on May 29. “I’m anticipating a motion to dismiss my charges before that date,” she said. “That could happen in light of today’s findings.”

Jamyrson Pittori, the attorney representing co-defendent Rector, says there simply wasn’t a case against the individuals in question. “When my client happened upon the scene on Nov. 30, the doors [of the bank building] were wide open, there were about a hundred people milling about,” Pittori says. “There were two police officers standing on the lawn not saying anything to anybody. There was amplified music coming out of the building. Who wouldn’t be curious? It looked like a lawful community event.”

Assistant District Attorney Rebekah Young said in court that she plans to re-file charges against Alcantara and Laurendau.

“I don’t see why,” Alcantara said after the hearing. “It’s going to waste a whole lot of taxpayers dollars.” He added that he might pursue a counter-lawsuit against the Santa Cruz Police Department and District Attorney. “I feel I’ve been selectively prosecuted because I’ve been out there throughout the whole [Occupy] movement,” he said.

Johnson agrees. “This particular case was scapegoating a bunch of activists,” she says. In an early April interview, ADA Young offered GT a different view. “What the current defendants would like you to think is that they’ve been picked on, they’ve been chosen because they’re community activists,” she said. “Nothing could be further from the truth.”

During the recent pre-trial hearings, the ADA presented a new estimate of damage incurred during the three-day occupation of the building, which is leased by Wells Fargo. Originally pegged to be $30,000, the amount is now said to be $22,000.

“I think Wells Fargo can absorb the $22,000,” said Pittori. “That would be a tax write off for them. But the thousands on top of thousands that we spend prosecuting innocent, curious people? There’s nowhere we can write that off.”

Judge Burdick also deemed testimony from David Gunter, the lead police investigator for the case, not to be credible after Gunter testified during one hearing that he hadn’t been at the occupied building on Dec. 2 and at a later hearing said he had.

For some of the co-defendants, the most unsettling thing about the case was the conspiracy charges.

“According to lawyers, conspiracy can have to do with anything before, during or after a supposed crime,” Wilson said. “If I meet with any of the other 11, it could be considered evidence that we were conspiring and committed a crime. It has a chilling and isolating influence.”

Pittori said that the ADA’s attempt to show conspiracy fell short. “The cases she did cite were murder cases where two co-defendants had active parts,” he said. ”You can’t stretch that to a trespass-vandalism case.”
According to ADA Young, the intent of the individual defendants is not what controls a charge.  “Everyone could come back after the fact and say, ‘I just wanted to give my support,’” she told GT in April. “What the law looks at is the conduct. Did you trespass in that building? That’s the touchstone.”

Outside of the courthouse, Wilson seemed pleased but not ready to celebrate. “I’m in the clearing but there are still woods around,” he said. “There are other people who are innocent, being accused of serious crimes. I encourage people to sign the online ACLU petition to drop all the charges.” As of press time, more than 1,000 people had signed the petition, which is titled “ACLU Statement of Support” and is found online at santacruzeleven.org.

“I hope justice prevails and truth is exposed,” Wilson added soberly.

Comments (7)Add Comment
...
written by John Colby, May 09, 2012
It should concern the community that Santa Cruz DA Rebekah Young would pursue prosecutions with such flimsy evidence. It is disturbing, suggesting that Santa Cruz is not immune to the larger police state apparatus nourished since 9/11 which is being flexed in reaction to the Occupy movement.
...
written by Robert Norse, May 05, 2012
These charges are part of a darkening political sky in Santa Cruz and across the country--an unconstitutional crackdown against the Occupy movement by authorities who would crush what looks to be the most vibrant protest movement in decades.

Good Times: Why not support alternative journalists like Alex, Becky, Bradley, me, and Brent? The prosecution has zero evidence of any vandalism done by any of the 11. Scapegoating whistleblowers is a crime. And so are empty buildings held by profiteering bankster crooks like Wells Fargo..
...
written by Robert Norse, May 05, 2012
At a rousing support rally abd march yesterday, typically sidelined by Sentinel, attorney Ben Rice announced the dismissal and selective prosecution motions for Darocy and Allen are likely to be postponed until Friday May 11th.

On the same day a "Support the 11 on the 11th" will be held at India JoZe Restaurant 3-6 PM Also check out the on-line petition at www.santacruzeleven.org .
...
written by Robert Norse, May 04, 2012
Thanks for this follow-up.

www.santacruzeleven.org is also a good first stop for updates on the case as well as www.indybay.org/santacruz.

Becky Johnson has written a number of hard-hitting articles at http://www.beckyjohnsononewoma...bel/Occupy Santa Cruz
...
written by Robert Norse, May 04, 2012
Though some of the charges were dropped against Alex Darocy and Bradley Stuart Allen at their Preliminary Hearing in March, prosecutor R Young has refiled them. A motion to dismiss these charges and argue that selective prosecution fatally taints this case will be heard 9 AM in Dept. 6 before Judge Burdick on Tuesday May 8th.

Darocy and Allen's trials are scheduled for May 21st, but the judge will be a different one than dismissed the charges against the four defendants as described in the article above.
...
written by Robert Norse, May 04, 2012
Judge Stephen A. Sillman of Monterey County, a visiting judge, will be hearing the trial. He will also be hearing the Preliminary Hearing of the last five of us as well.

Chillingly, Sillman, on even less "evidence" than Young presented in Burdick's court, still found enough to forward "conspiracy to trespass", and two trespass charges to trial. No evidence of a prior agreement, no indication of the elements of the trespass charges present. The same far-fetched claim that the two were "aiding-and-abetting" just by being present.
...
written by Robert Norse, May 04, 2012
Though some of the charges were dropped against Alex Darocy and Bradley Stuart Allen at their Preliminary Hearing in March, prosecutor R Young has refiled them. A motion to dismiss these charges and argue that selective prosecution fatally taints this case will be heard 9 AM in Dept. 6 before Judge Burdick on Tuesday May 8th.

Darocy and Allen's trials are scheduled for May 21st, but the judge will be a different one than dismissed the charges against the four defendants as described in the article above.

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Cardinal Grand Cross in the Sky

Following Holy Week (passion, death and burial of the Pisces World Teacher) and Easter Sunday (Resurrection Festival), from April 19 to the 23, the long-awaited and discussed Cardinal Cross of Change appears in the sky, composed of Cardinal signs Aries, Libra, Cancer, and Capricorn, with planets (13-14 degrees) Uranus (in Aries), Jupiter (in Cancer), Mars (in Libra) and Pluto (in Capricorn), an actual geometrical square or cross configuration. Cardinal signs mark the seasons of change, initiating new realities.

 

Sugar: The New Tobacco?

Proposed bill would require warning labels on sugary drinks Will soda and other saccharine libations soon come with a health warning? They will if it’s up to our state senator, Bill Monning (D-Carmel). On Feb. 27, Monning proposed first-of-its-kind legislation that would require a consumer warning label be placed on sugar-sweetened beverages sold in California. SB 1000, also known as the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Safety Warning Act, was proposed to provide vital information to consumers about the harmful effects of consuming sugary drinks, such as sodas, sports drinks, energy drinks, and sweetened teas.

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of April 17

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >

 

Growing Hope

Campos Seguros combats sexual assault in the Watsonville farmworker community Farm work was a way of life for Rocio Camargo, who grew up in Watsonville as the daughter of Mexican immigrants. Her parents met while working the fields 30 years ago, and her father went on to run Fuentes Berry Farms.
Sign up for Tomorrow's Good Times Today
Upcoming arts & events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Foodie File: Red Apple Cafe

Breakfast takes center stage at Gracia Krakauer's Red Apple Cafe Before they moved to Aptos, Gracia and her husband Dan Krakauer would visit friends in Santa Cruz County and eat at the Red Apple Café all the time. Then they moved up here from Santa Monica five years ago, and bought the Aptos location (there’s a separate one in Watsonville) from the family who owned it for two decades.

 

How would you feel about a tech industry boom in Santa Cruz?

I feel like it would ruin the small old-town feeling of Santa Cruz. It wouldn’t be the same Surf City kind of vacation town that it is. Antoinette BennettSanta Cruz | Construction Management

 

Trout Gulch Vineyards

Cinsault 2012—la grande plage diurne The most popular wines on store shelves are those most generally known and available—Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, which are all superb for sure. But when you come across a more unusual varietal, like Trout Gulch Vineyards’ Cinsault ($18), it opens up a whole new world.

 

Waddell Creek, Al Fresco

Route One Summer Farm Dinner You’ve been buying their insanely fresh produce for years now at farmers’ markets. Right? So now why not become more familiar with the gorgeous Waddell Creek farmlands of Route One Farms?