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May 27th
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In Defense of Education

news1_protestParticipants in the March 4 UCSC protests share their stories
“I am a language teacher!” UC Santa Cruz Italian lecturer Giulia Centineo screamed into the loudspeaker during a March 4 protest at UC Santa Cruz. Centineo held the microphone up to her lips and addressed the crowd, her hand trembling, perhaps out of nervousness or simply passion. “For years the administration has been shoving down our throats the idea that students are clients. No, students are students! I don't sell Italian! I teach Italian!”

An army of fists shot up in the air and cries of solidarity rang out across the intersection of Bay and High streets, which had been blocked off by protestors since early that morning.

Hundreds of UCSC students, faculty and supporters attended the protest at the base of campus as part of a state and system-wide Day of Action to Defend Public Education. Students came to protest the spike in student fees, which have increased 300 percent since 2002 and will increase another 15 percent this upcoming fall quarter. Professors, faculty members, and staff came to protest a furlough program that has cut their number of workdays and decreased workers’ salaries by somewhere between 5 and 10 percent for the year, depending on their position and original salary. Programs like History of Consciousness, Language Studies, and Latin American and Latino Studies could soon face serious cuts.

One of numerous protests occurring simultaneously across the Golden State, the UCSC event was a colorful expression of student opinion and demands. There was guerilla theater and slam poetry. Some brought their guitars. They arrived sporting signs with sayings like “Who’s gonna teach, when teachers are on the streets?” By 7 a.m. activists had blocked all entrances to the campus, and UCSC Public Affairs had advised all employees not to come in for work. The protests had effectively shut down campus.

For those in attendance, increasing budget cuts had become a personal matter. Good Times caught up with a handful of those affected to hear their stories.

news1-3Keeping the Books

Ken Lyons, reference librarian for the school’s McHenry Library, also spoke at the rally. He has been affected by the university’s furlough program and is subsequently taking one extra day off a month. But for Lyons, furloughs are the easy part. “That’s the part where I don’t come into work,” says the nine-year faculty member with laugh. “It's the pay cut. That's the big part.”

Lyons, who drives a 32-year-old car he says is “falling apart,” notes that when you take inflation into account, most librarians' salaries are approximately back to what they were in 1999. “And the cost of living has skyrocketed in the past 11 years—certainly around these parts,” he says. “So yeah, it means a lot to me.”

For the 2009-2010 school year, the library has been grappling with a 14.5 percent budget that has forced them to cut back on their services and hours. In spring 2008 the library was open for about 100 hours a week. This year, it's open 67 hours a week. The reduction in hours has forced the library to close one day a week, on Saturdays, a change Lyons calls “appalling for a research university.”

He notices more and more students have been coming to the reference desk looking for a book that isn’t on the shelf but also isn’t listed as “checked out.” “It's because there are just feet after feet after feet of books that need to be re-shelved with nobody to re-shelve them,” Lyons says.

Lyons understands that the university has been tasked with a target budget reduction goal by the state (as part of the governors attempt to fix California’s $20 billion deficit), but he says the cuts are happening in the wrong places. “When you think about it from a corporate perspective, it makes total sense what they're doing,” says Lyons, quickly adding, “but it's wrong.”

Student Government Takes Action

UCSC student Victor Sanchez is the President of the University of California Student Association (UCSA) and the External Vice Chair for the Student Union Assembly (SUA), both of which are trying to protect funding for UC students.

The SUA at UCSC passed a resolution in support of the action, and Sanchez stood in full support of any nonviolent action taking place. “I'll be yelling my lungs out,” Sanchez said before the strike. “Ultimately, being a part of this larger movement is empowering in itself.”

The UCSA has a five-step platform they are promoting this month. It includes full funding for the UC back to 2001 levels and that the legislature looks for alternative revenue sources. But Sanchez says their number one issue is protecting the Cal Grant, a form of student aid for California residents that could soon find itself on the chopping block.

In Sanchez’s first year at UCSC, he lost about four friends who weren't quite able to pay or qualify for the Cal Grant. Sanchez, a Latino/Chicano student, believes the aid is a tremendous asset for underrepresented communities. The Latino student population is currently at 4.7 percent of the total student body, and the African American population is currently 2.6 percent.

Sanchez qualified for financial support, himself, his first year of college. He will be receiving it again for the 2010-2011 school year. The grant pays up $9,700 in student fees depending on the price of the college and the student’s need. The amount of aid varies from one student to another.

Sanchez worries he will still graduate with $20,000 in debt and has been forced to take out loans in order to cover the cost of his education. “God forbid if I want to buy a house by the time I'm 35,” Sanchez says.

Speaking the Language

“I want to remain optimistic,” says language teacher Centineo, adding that it isn't always easy.

The Division of Humanities, which includes UCSC’s language programs, is currently wondering if it will have to cut whole languages in order to make ends meet. One recent proposal includes plans to cut Hindi/Urdu, Portuguese and Russian, a move that would save the division $182,000 per year. This past year, the division already cut 11 percent of Italian classes, the language that Centineo teaches.

“I can't even think about it,” Centineo says. “This is how concerned I am: I can't think about it because I invested all of my resources in this job.”

Centineo is also concerned for her students. She has seen many struggle to keep up in classes as they start working more, sometimes as much as 30 hours a week. Others have been proud to be the first in their families to attend college. They now worry the rising cost of fees might make them the last.

Centineo calls the issue of funding for public education “very personal” because where she comes from in Italy, public higher education for a low price is a higher priority.

“Over there, it's part of our culture that education has to be accessible to all,” she told GT moments after her rousing speech to the crowd, her voice then disappearing into the surrounding chants of “Sí, se puede! Sí, se puede! Sí, se puede!”

The Conversation Continues

news1-2Community Studies Lecturer and Santa Cruz Mayor Mike Rotkin, who will no longer have his teaching job by the end of this school year, believes the University of California is experiencing a “crisis of priorities.” Similarly, Dining Hall workers say that they have faced cuts in pay, while simultaneously being asked to take on more duties like janitorial services.

Participants discussed solutions, such as Assembly Bill 656, which would place a tax on oil companies, repealing Proposition 13, and spending less money on the state’s prison system. But one thing was clear for many of the rally’s attendants: leaving is just not an option.

“For all its faults, I do really love this campus and the students here and my co-workers,” reference librarian Lyons says. “I like the place, and I like who I work with and for, but I don't like the structure.”

Photos by Melissa R. Black

Comments (1)Add Comment
Hey! You voted for them!
written by Steve Hartman, March 10, 2010
80-95% of all UCSC students vote the same way, for the same candidates and the same issues. And just like the California Supreme Court attested to, those candidates and issues are contrary to the wants and needs of the local community.

In Santa Cruz's specific case, it takes over 70% of the local community to vote against your power to keep you from winning every election candidate and/or issue. And you wonder why we don't care if you're hurting? With most normal communities, candidates and issues are decided within the 60-40 margin. So for locals to get a 70% vote against your power is sort of like demanding lower tuition. It's a pipe dream!

To be fair, it's not just you at UCSC. It is "you" UC system wide.

You nearly all vote democrat and the more left the better, just like your lecturers and professors. So if you're looking for sympathy from average middle America, you aren't going to get it. YOU elected these screwballs and now you're suffering some consequences for your actions. Consequences? It's about time, I might add. (By that I mean the actions of the perennial student vote-not your specific vote, per se)

Case in point: The prison union has bought and paid for your democratic leaders in Sacramento. And as you all know, the prisons now get way more money for their budget than the entire state gets for education. Catch my drift? You've voted to make prisons and prisoners a bigger and more valued priority than to yourselves and education.

Start thinking for yourselves, or ask your "local" neighbors how they feel about these situations before you cast your for the pc or academia espoused candidate, and you may one day find salvation. Tuition salvation that is...

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As the sun enters Gemini on Sunday, sign of speaking, communication, thinking, inter-relations, writing and understanding languages, the feast days of Pentecost & Shavuot (Catholic and Jewish festivals) occur. During Pentecost’s 50 days after Easter, tongues of fire appear above the heads of the disciples, providing them with the ability to understand all languages and all feelings hidden in the minds and hearts of humanity. It’s recorded that Pentecost began with a loud noise, which happened in an upper room (signifying the mind). The Christ (World Teacher) told his disciples (after his ascension) when encountering a man at a well carrying a water pot (signs for Age of Aquarius) to follow him to an upper room. There, the Holy Spirit (Ray 3 of Divine Intelligence) would overshadow them, expand their minds, give them courage and enable them to teach throughout the world, speaking all languages and thus able to minister to the true needs of a “seeking” humanity. Pentecost (50 days, pentagram, Ray 5, Venus, concrete and scientific knowledge, the Ray of Aquarius) sounds dramatic, impressive and scary: The loud noise, a thunderous rush of wind and then “tongues of fire” above the heads of each disciple (men and women). Fire has purpose. It purifies, disintegrates, purges, transforms and liberates (frees) us from the past. This was the Holy Spirit (Ray 3, love and wisdom) being received by the disciples, so they would teach in the world and inform humanity of the Messiah (Christ), who initiated the new age (Pisces) and gave humanity the new law (adding to the 10 Commandments of the Aries Age) to Love (Ray 2) one another. Note: Gemini is also Ray 2. Shavuot is the Jewish Festival of Gladness, the First Fruits Festival celebrating the giving of the 10 Commandments to Moses as the Aries Age was initiated. Thus, we have two developmental stages here, Jewish festival of the Old Testament. Pentecost of the New Testament. We have gladness, integrating both.
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