Santa Cruz Good Times

Sunday
Apr 20th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Transition in Scotts Valley

transitioninsvScotts Valley says farewell to longstanding city councilmember while his replacement gears up to tackle the town’s key issues

There were seven candidates vying for three open seats on Scotts Valley’s city council this November. Councilmembers Randy Johnson and Dene Bustichi were re-elected, both with 23 percent of the vote, making retired police sergeant Donna Lind, who was close behind with 22 percent, the only newcomer in the victorious trio. She will be taking the place of Cliff Barrett, who has served on the city council for almost a decade.

Looking back over his years on the Scotts Valley City Council, Barrett is proud of many things. There was the off-leash dog park, one of his first successful projects, and the first of its kind in the county. He also helped make the creek clean-up, e-waste pick-up, green building ordinance and Styrofoam ban realities. Overall, Barrett says he spent his time on the council “trying to keep Scotts Valley the nice town it is,” which he says currently means completing the downtown center.

“The town center is vital to Scotts Valley’s continued growth and vitality and should be the main focus,” he says. He hopes that other items on the table won’t distract the incoming council from getting the center built in the next five years.

“It’s like Bush’s situation—he started with Afghanistan and then went off to Iraq. He lost his focus. I hope our council doesn’t loose its focus and go ahead with Target instead,” he said. His advice for the next council is to go through with the proposed town center first, and let the Target development happen afterward if it must. He foresees negative impacts on the town center if both developments are allowed to progress simultaneously. But it’s someone else’s problem now, he jokes.

“That was my concern and I don’t have to worry about it anymore,” he says. “I’m about ready to have some fun.”

Fortunately for Barrett, while he is enjoying his retirement, his successor plans to be addressing his concerns. As with Barrett, the town center is at the top of Lind’s list.

“The town center is first,” says Lind. “A heart for the city, something to tie it together, is something I’ve hoped to see come to be for 20 years. The town center is and has been my biggest priority.” Having followed the plans closely, Lind is happy with how the current council has pushed the matter, and looks forward to helping in the process. “I can work with the current council, and be part of the team,” she says.

However, while Barrett would like to see the incoming council delay the Target project until after the completion of the town center, Lind feels that some overlap is inevitable.

“The town center is further along in the process, and it’s appropriate that it comes up first,” she says. “But some of the issues go hand in hand [with Target], and it’s also appropriate that we look and see how one affects the other.” She adds that it is hard to know exactly how the two developments will pan out, as the city is still receiving and considering information from various studies and reports.

Although the fruition of the town center is her number one—and she promising not to lose focus, as Barrett would say—Lind does not deny that there are pressing economic challenges to be tackled. These difficulties will unavoidably be at the forefront of the new council’s agenda.

“We have several developments, as far as the town center, Target, moving the propane tanks—a lot of things going on,” she says. “But the economy is a challenge for all cities. The bottom line is that we need to find ways to generate revenue without raising taxes, and without giving up our core services.”

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Cardinal Grand Cross in the Sky

Following Holy Week (passion, death and burial of the Pisces World Teacher) and Easter Sunday (Resurrection Festival), from April 19 to the 23, the long-awaited and discussed Cardinal Cross of Change appears in the sky, composed of Cardinal signs Aries, Libra, Cancer, and Capricorn, with planets (13-14 degrees) Uranus (in Aries), Jupiter (in Cancer), Mars (in Libra) and Pluto (in Capricorn), an actual geometrical square or cross configuration. Cardinal signs mark the seasons of change, initiating new realities.

 

Sugar: The New Tobacco?

Proposed bill would require warning labels on sugary drinks Will soda and other saccharine libations soon come with a health warning? They will if it’s up to our state senator, Bill Monning (D-Carmel). On Feb. 27, Monning proposed first-of-its-kind legislation that would require a consumer warning label be placed on sugar-sweetened beverages sold in California. SB 1000, also known as the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Safety Warning Act, was proposed to provide vital information to consumers about the harmful effects of consuming sugary drinks, such as sodas, sports drinks, energy drinks, and sweetened teas.

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of April 17

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >

 

Growing Hope

Campos Seguros combats sexual assault in the Watsonville farmworker community Farm work was a way of life for Rocio Camargo, who grew up in Watsonville as the daughter of Mexican immigrants. Her parents met while working the fields 30 years ago, and her father went on to run Fuentes Berry Farms.
Sign up for Tomorrow's Good Times Today
Upcoming arts & events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Foodie File: Red Apple Cafe

Breakfast takes center stage at Gracia Krakauer's Red Apple Cafe Before they moved to Aptos, Gracia and her husband Dan Krakauer would visit friends in Santa Cruz County and eat at the Red Apple Café all the time. Then they moved up here from Santa Monica five years ago, and bought the Aptos location (there’s a separate one in Watsonville) from the family who owned it for two decades.

 

How would you feel about a tech industry boom in Santa Cruz?

I feel like it would ruin the small old-town feeling of Santa Cruz. It wouldn’t be the same Surf City kind of vacation town that it is. Antoinette BennettSanta Cruz | Construction Management

 

Trout Gulch Vineyards

Cinsault 2012—la grande plage diurne The most popular wines on store shelves are those most generally known and available—Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, which are all superb for sure. But when you come across a more unusual varietal, like Trout Gulch Vineyards’ Cinsault ($18), it opens up a whole new world.

 

Waddell Creek, Al Fresco

Route One Summer Farm Dinner You’ve been buying their insanely fresh produce for years now at farmers’ markets. Right? So now why not become more familiar with the gorgeous Waddell Creek farmlands of Route One Farms?