Santa Cruz Good Times

Tuesday
Sep 16th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Town Hall with Congressman Sam Farr

sam_farr2Planned Parenthood Mar Monte has chosen to honor you as one of their 2011 “Voices for Change”—dubbing you the “Voice for Freedom.” What are the biggest obstacles facing Panned Parenthood today, and how are you working to address them?

I am honored and humbled to be recognized by Planned Parenthood Mar Monte, and I am equally proud of the work we have done to protect issues of women’s health. But as the last few weeks have shown us, there is still much work to do.

Hidden behind straw man arguments, Republicans have launched a full-on assault on Planned Parenthood and women’s health. They have armed themselves with misguided rhetoric and false information—citing the opposition to the use of federal funds for abortions as the base for cutting off funding for Planned Parenthood. But in reality, not one penny of federal funding is used for abortions. For that reason, I voiced strong opposition to Republican attempts to drag Planned Parenthood and women’s health into a debate about fiscal responsibility.

The bottom line is that for countless women, Planned Parenthood health centers are their only source of healthcare. On the Central Coast, Planned Parenthood Mar Monte provides more than 70,000 patient visits a year—for women seeking primary care services that range from cancer screenings to breast exams. If it were not for Planned Parenthood, some women would not know where to turn to for healthcare services.

We have to draw a line on the sand, separate fact from fiction, and push back against misguided and misinformed rhetoric that threatens to discriminately cut off healthcare services for thousands of women on the Central Coast. For that reason, I will continue to stand with Planned Parenthood Mar Monte and with women all over the country in support of women’s health.

Considering the recent budget debates and near government shutdown because of lack of compromise, what would your ideal budget for today’s United States look like? If you had your way, how would you change the process of creating a budget?

Our federal budget represents a direct reflection of the ideals and priorities of our nation, and a blueprint of the kind of future we want to build for our children and grandchildren. A federal budget must meet the obligations and expectations of government. And part of our obligation to the American people is to address our long-term fiscal solvency and debt.

But our responsibility also lies in constructing a balanced budget that does not push the economy back into recession, undermines the middle class, or wipes away investments for long-term growth and our nation’s competiveness in the global economy. In addition, a balanced budget must not place the burden of deficit reduction on the backs of seniors and working Americans.

At a time when a vast number of families are still struggling with the effects of the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression, it is unjustifiable to cut funding for programs that are helping people makes ends meet—while subsidizing tax breaks for our country’s wealthiest. Therefore, any serious budget that seeks to balance spending and reduce the deficit, must take a balanced approach that also requires corporations and millionaires and billionaires to pay their fair share.

Fiscal responsibility does not require slashing social programs and public investments that promote economic activity and generate growth. Instead, it requires smart policies for improving the efficiency of healthcare, creating jobs and establishing a fair and honest tax code that does not favor the wealthiest and privileged.

Unfortunately, Republicans seem satisfied with taking the lop-sided approach. If we are to meet our obligation of addressing the national deficit and safeguarding the investments that uphold our American ideals, we need to adopt a budget process that drops partisan politics. The budget process can not be dominated by ideological wars and political games. Because in the end, score keeping and name calling will not produce a budget that builds a stronger America with opportunity and economic security for all. 

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Watch List

From Google to the government to data brokers, why your privacy is now a thing of the past

 

A Different Revolution

Aries Moon late Wednesday and Thursday. We think new thoughts and initiate new ideas. Sun in Virgo with Saturn in Scorpio help disciples to create orderly structures to anchor and bring forth new ideas. Stabilizing Taurus moon Friday and Saturday. We anchor new ideas into form and matter, like seeds planted in the soil. We tend them, waiting for green shoots to emerge. Like the gestating Virgo Sun Madonna, awaiting the birth of the holy child, the Soul, the new light at winter solstice. Mercury and Chiron converse about what hurts and what heals.Saturday is a complex day with Mercury (communication), Mars (action!) and Uranus (revolution). Mercury in Libra is opposite Uranus in Aries. Oppositions (recognizing something new appearing over there somewhere) eventually synthesize. Mercury in Libra calls for Right Action and Right Relations, especially with money. Uranus in Aries—the revolution this time must be different.  Also on Saturday, Mars enters Sagittarius. Where are we going, what are our goals, where’s justice, where’s the mountain, do we have good shoes? Sunday Venus trines Pluto—in-depth assessment of money, values and resources. Gemini moon Monday; we talk a lot, tending to tasks in gardens and neighborhoods. Cancer Moon Tuesday and Wednesday; we nurture and nourish. The stars and planets remind us.Note: William Meader, esoteric author & international teacher, will be speaking on “The Soul of Humanity Evolving Through Crisis” at Meditation Mount, 7pm, Friday, Sept. 12.

 

Final Cut

Cedar Street Video to close after 10 years at downtown location

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of September 12

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Wood Fire Woodie

Scotts Valley pizzeria gets fired up the old-school way

 

What's your all-time best Skyview Flea Market score?

Santa Cruz | eBay Business

 

Best of Santa Cruz County

The 2013 Santa Cruz County Readers' Poll and Critics’ Picks It’s our biggest issue of the year, and in it, your votes—more than 6,500 of them—determined the winners of The Best of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll. New to the long list of local restaurants, shops and other notables that captured your interest: Best Beer Selection, Best Locally Owned Business, Best Customer Service and Best Marijuana Dispensary. In the meantime, many readers were ever so chatty online about potential new categories. Some of the suggestions that stood out: Best Teen Program and Best Web Design/Designer. But what about: Dog Park, Church, Hotel, Local Farm, Therapist (I second that!) or Sports Bar—not to be confused with Bra. Our favorite suggestion: Best Act of Kindness—one reader noted Café Gratitude and the free meals it offered to the Santa Cruz Police Department in the aftermath of recent crimes. Perhaps some of these can be woven into next year’s ballot, so stay tuned. In the meantime, enjoy the following pages and take note of our Critics’ Picks, too, beginning on page 91. A big thanks for voting—and for reading—and an even bigger congratulations to all of the winners. Enjoy.  -Greg Archer, EditorBest of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll INDEX

 

Soquel’s Pinot Winner

When you taste Soquel Vineyards’ extraordinary 2012 Partners’ Reserve Pinot Noir, you will know why it won a Double Gold in June at the 2014 San Francisco International Wine Competition.