Santa Cruz Good Times

Friday
Aug 22nd
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Town Hall with Assemblymember Bill Monning

bill MonningThe realignment of state prisoners to county jails began in october—how does Santa Cruz County’s handling of the shift compare to in other parts of the state?
While I am not familiar with what every county in the state is doing with regard to implementing public safety realignment, I can definitively state that based on what I have seen and heard from community members, Santa Cruz County is doing a good job and should be commended on the innovative open process it has established to administer realignment.  
The county has been a pioneer in developing successful community based alternatives to incarceration for non-violent juvenile offenders and is working to duplicate some of these successes with the adult incarcerated population.  In addition, local law enforcement has partnered with the County Office of Education to establish the Broad-based Apprehension Suppression Treatment and Alternatives (BASTA) Program. The BASTA Program is a committee of community groups that are working together to develop a curriculum for offenders that includes education as an alternative to incarceration.

I have heard Phil Wowak, the Santa Cruz County Sheriff, say many times that the people we are sending to state prison are still members of our community and that it is the community’s responsibility to ensure their successful rehabilitation. Santa Cruz County is working to implement a public safety realignment program that is cost effective and based on programs that reduce recidivism, victimization, and probation failures. I commend the collaborative efforts to implement public safety realignment in a positive, safe, and dynamic manner in Santa Cruz County.
A Veterans Center recently opened here in Santa Cruz County at Cabrillo. What state services will be provided at the new Center?  
Upon returning to civilian life, Roderick Moreland, an Air Force Veteran, discovered that there were no programs or service groups within the community dedicated to helping veterans transition from active duty service to students at higher education institutions. He used his personal insight and the information he gleaned from talking to other veterans to spearhead the Veterans Information Center at Cabrillo College.  
There are more than 200 veterans enrolled at Cabrillo College and the center is providing peer mentoring to veterans and assisting them with negotiating the complicated bureaucracy that lies between military service and higher education. The program also provides a central location for accessing information about state and federal benefits due veterans.  

Not only do returning Iraq and Afghanistan veterans face bureaucratic challenges in school, but they can experience various forms of prejudice from faculty and non-veteran students. The Veterans Information Center provides both a safe and supportive place for returning veterans and can advocate for veterans at their respective institutions. I applaud the work of Mr. Moreland and encourage veterans who are students or thinking about becoming students to visit the Veterans Information Center at Cabrillo Community College.  
November is Diabetes Awareness month, what have you done as Chair of the Assembly Committee on Health to educate Central Coast residents about this deadly disease?  
I have used my position as Chair of the Assembly Health Committee to educate Central Coast residents about how they can modify their behaviors in order to prevent and control chronic diseases, like diabetes, as well as to promote public health interventions. The healthy school lunch programs in Santa Cruz are an excellent example of what can be achieved when a community works together to prevent and control chronic diseases. Local schools have partnered with local farmers and the Second Harvest Foodbank to educate students about the importance of maintaining healthful diets and provide access to healthful food choices in their schools.    
In communities of color, many people are still not aware of the risk factors associated with diabetes. People are at high risk for diabetes if 45 years old or older; Latino, African American, Native American or Asian/Pacific Islander; overweight; have high blood pressure; have a family history of diabetes; and/or had diabetes during pregnancy or had a baby weighing more than nine pounds at birth.  
Additionally, there are obvious signs and symptoms of diabetes that everyone should be aware of including extreme thirst; periodic blurry vision; frequent urination; unusual tiredness or drowsiness; or unexplained weight loss.  
If you, a family member, or a friend has any one of these symptoms, a doctor should be contacted immediately. Diabetes is a serious disease that can lead to blindness, heart attack, stroke, kidney failure, amputation and death. Early detection and treatment of diabetes can lead to a longer, healthier life. Together we can help each other by sharing information, promoting healthful diet and exercise, and supporting family members and friends who may be at risk. V

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Trending Now

Whether you live by the Vogue bible or choose to go into your day wearing what you slept in, odds are you wear clothes.

 

The Thought Form of Solution

It’s our last week of Leo before the sun enters Virgo (next Friday/Saturday). The planets this week make complex patterns and relationships (vibrational cadences and rhythms) with the outer planets, mainly Neptune—the planet that veils, obscures, protects and finally refines us. Neptune offers us entrance into a deeply spiritual sense of comfort and solace. Neptune is the personality ruler of Pisces (saviors of the world) and soul ruler of Cancer (world mother). “The fish goddesses who leapt from earth (Virgo) to water (Pisces) unitedly give birth to the Fish God (Christ, the Soul) who introduces the waters of life  (Neptune & Aquarius) into the ocean of substance (matter, mother bringing light to the world. Thus does Neptune work.” (Esoteric Astrology).

 

Final Cut

Cedar Street Video to close after 10 years at downtown location

 

Cultures Collide

No surprises, but lots to savor in foodie film ‘The Hundred-Foot Journey’
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

 

Foodie File: Kauboi

Japanese-Western themed unites sushi with whiskey and beefgrill

 

How should Santa Cruz develop downtown around the San Lorenzo River?

Santa Cruz | Artist/Show Promoter

 

Best of Santa Cruz County

The 2013 Santa Cruz County Readers' Poll and Critics’ Picks It’s our biggest issue of the year, and in it, your votes—more than 6,500 of them—determined the winners of The Best of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll. New to the long list of local restaurants, shops and other notables that captured your interest: Best Beer Selection, Best Locally Owned Business, Best Customer Service and Best Marijuana Dispensary. In the meantime, many readers were ever so chatty online about potential new categories. Some of the suggestions that stood out: Best Teen Program and Best Web Design/Designer. But what about: Dog Park, Church, Hotel, Local Farm, Therapist (I second that!) or Sports Bar—not to be confused with Bra. Our favorite suggestion: Best Act of Kindness—one reader noted Café Gratitude and the free meals it offered to the Santa Cruz Police Department in the aftermath of recent crimes. Perhaps some of these can be woven into next year’s ballot, so stay tuned. In the meantime, enjoy the following pages and take note of our Critics’ Picks, too, beginning on page 91. A big thanks for voting—and for reading—and an even bigger congratulations to all of the winners. Enjoy.  -Greg Archer, EditorBest of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll INDEX

 

Have Mercy!

Looking for a frisky summer wine at a reasonable price? Look no further than Mercy Vineyards’ 2013 Sauvignon Blanc ($20). Richly textured “with an exotic flavor profile,” the wine reveals aromas of honeydew melon and honeysuckle, with anise appearing as a star attraction. Smidgeons of pineapple and honeycomb add a touch of sexiness to this well-balanced, easy-drinking wine, which pairs well with a variety of cuisine —especially ceviche, calamari and other not-too-heavy foods.