Santa Cruz Good Times

Saturday
Apr 19th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Town Hall with Supervisor Greg Caput

How will the recent news about the halt of methyl iodide sales affect South Santa Cruz County?

I have personally spent much time reflecting on the future of pesticide use in the Pájaro Valley. As has been well documented of late, the years-long battle over the potentially dangerous use of methyl iodide has come to a close as Arysta LifeScience has decided to halt all sales of its patent product, methyl iodide, in California and the United States.

Methyl iodide was adopted as the replacement pesticide to methyl bromide, which was banned as a result of the Montreal Treaty and is set to be phased out completely by 2015. Whereas methyl bromide has been cited as destructive to the ozone layer, opponents of methyl iodide claim its chemical toxicity can alter human DNA and taint groundwater, potentially causing cancer to those exposed.

The Board of Supervisors, of which I am a member, unanimously passed a resolution urging Gov. Jerry Brown to reassess the state’s approval of methyl iodide. Additionally, I have personally stated my opposition to methyl iodide to the farmer community who, to their great credit, refrained from using the legally sanctioned substance until further review.

Methyl iodide is now off the market and no longer an option. We must now move beyond conversations of methyl iodide and consider what alternatives to methyl bromide will be available to us come 2015. Whereas many, including myself, would love to see the proliferation of organic farms and crop-rotating practices, the commercial viability of doing so on a scale comparable to conventional methods has yet to be proven. This would, of course, result in a substantial drop in regional profitability—a concern to many, including myself.

Members of the assembly and senate have urged Gov. Jerry Brown to form a working group to develop alternatives that will give farmers the tools they need to protect crops while ensuring the health of rural communities and farm workers.

I am completely supportive of these efforts and hope to spawn local dialogues between interested parties so as to ensure that concerns for the health of local residents as well as the commercial viability of conventional farming are both taken under consideration. Ideally, a new pesticide that is much more friendly to our environment and workers will emerge. But at this given moment the best that we can do is to make sure that locals are fully informed and that we stay abreast of any and all new developments as this issue is of critical importance to not only the Pájaro Valley but the Monterey Bay Area as a whole.
What is the status of your redwood tree planting project?

With the help of the Estrada family, Bill Vaughan, Big Creek Lumber and Cal Poly Swanton Pacific, we have been able to plant more than 1,000 native redwood trees this month alone. These 1,000 trees are in addition to the thousands of trees and shrubs already planted by Watsonville Wetlands Watch, the Land Trust of Santa Cruz County and local cities and organizations across the county. Local youth from the Boy Scouts and Community Restoration have seen up close and personal the exact process and necessities of planting trees into the ground firmly and in places where water and adequate sunlight is available. Such plantings lead to broader conversations of ecosystems and relationships between humans and nature.

Contact Supervisor Caput about these matters and others at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Cardinal Grand Cross in the Sky

Following Holy Week (passion, death and burial of the Pisces World Teacher) and Easter Sunday (Resurrection Festival), from April 19 to the 23, the long-awaited and discussed Cardinal Cross of Change appears in the sky, composed of Cardinal signs Aries, Libra, Cancer, and Capricorn, with planets (13-14 degrees) Uranus (in Aries), Jupiter (in Cancer), Mars (in Libra) and Pluto (in Capricorn), an actual geometrical square or cross configuration. Cardinal signs mark the seasons of change, initiating new realities.

 

Sugar: The New Tobacco?

Proposed bill would require warning labels on sugary drinks Will soda and other saccharine libations soon come with a health warning? They will if it’s up to our state senator, Bill Monning (D-Carmel). On Feb. 27, Monning proposed first-of-its-kind legislation that would require a consumer warning label be placed on sugar-sweetened beverages sold in California. SB 1000, also known as the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Safety Warning Act, was proposed to provide vital information to consumers about the harmful effects of consuming sugary drinks, such as sodas, sports drinks, energy drinks, and sweetened teas.

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of April 17

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >

 

Growing Hope

Campos Seguros combats sexual assault in the Watsonville farmworker community Farm work was a way of life for Rocio Camargo, who grew up in Watsonville as the daughter of Mexican immigrants. Her parents met while working the fields 30 years ago, and her father went on to run Fuentes Berry Farms.
Sign up for Tomorrow's Good Times Today
Upcoming arts & events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Foodie File: Red Apple Cafe

Breakfast takes center stage at Gracia Krakauer's Red Apple Cafe Before they moved to Aptos, Gracia and her husband Dan Krakauer would visit friends in Santa Cruz County and eat at the Red Apple Café all the time. Then they moved up here from Santa Monica five years ago, and bought the Aptos location (there’s a separate one in Watsonville) from the family who owned it for two decades.

 

How would you feel about a tech industry boom in Santa Cruz?

I feel like it would ruin the small old-town feeling of Santa Cruz. It wouldn’t be the same Surf City kind of vacation town that it is. Antoinette BennettSanta Cruz | Construction Management

 

Trout Gulch Vineyards

Cinsault 2012—la grande plage diurne The most popular wines on store shelves are those most generally known and available—Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, which are all superb for sure. But when you come across a more unusual varietal, like Trout Gulch Vineyards’ Cinsault ($18), it opens up a whole new world.

 

Waddell Creek, Al Fresco

Route One Summer Farm Dinner You’ve been buying their insanely fresh produce for years now at farmers’ markets. Right? So now why not become more familiar with the gorgeous Waddell Creek farmlands of Route One Farms?