Santa Cruz Good Times

Sunday
Apr 26th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Town Hall with Assemblymember Bill Monning

What happens now that the maker of methyl iodide has removed its product from markets in California and the United States?

ArystaLifeScience Inc.’s confirmation on March 20 that it had suspended the sale of the fumigant methyl iodide in the United States due to lack of  “economic viability” represents a victory for the health and safety of the public, workers, and the environment. Scientists, environmental and worker advocates, elected officials, agriculturists, and members of the public at large successfully placed pressure on Arysta to remove methyl iodide from the marketplace. In the end, only six California growers applied methyl iodide in the state.   

Because Arysta has voluntarily removed its product, it can resume the sale of methyl iodide in the U.S. where only EPA approval is required for product use.  However, in California, the Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR) would be required to conduct another approval process, including a public comment period, if the company decides to renew sales of methyl iodide.   
It is important to note that the lawsuit filed early last year against DPR on behalf of workers and rural communities on the basis that scientific evidence was ignored and that emergency regulations were improperly applied, remains unresolved. Though a decision was expected earlier this year, Arysta requested a new hearing in order to share product updates it believes will affect the final decision, which is now expected by May 1, 2012.   

With the required phase-out of the soil fumigant methyl bromide in 2014, the agriculture industry is still in need of an alternative product or farming process. I remain committed to continue my work with all stakeholders to find a balanced solution that protects the health of the public and environment, as well as provides the agricultural industry with the necessary tools it needs to flourish.  
Last month the federal Supreme Court held three days of testimony on federal healthcare reform. What will happen in California if portions of the federal law or the entire statute are struck down?
The three days of testimony held by the United States Supreme Court on federal healthcare reform were truly unprecedented and, this June, California and the nation will find out the fate of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), which has already helped millions of Californians to obtain access to drugs and preventive services with no cost sharing; extend coverage to their adult children; and protect children from preexisting condition exclusions.

The Supreme Court hearings primarily focused on the constitutionality of the individual mandate and the Medicaid Expansion provisions in the ACA.   
I am confident that the Supreme Court will uphold the ACA. California is moving forward to implement the provisions of the Act as quickly and thoughtfully as possible. As I have indicated, some of the provisions of the ACA have already taken effect. For example, more than 12 million Californians no longer have a lifetime limit on their health insurance policy coverage; more than 6.1 million Californians have had their healthcare coverage improved to include the coverage of preventive care without cost-sharing; more than 355,000 young adults under age 26 can remain on their parents' health insurance coverage; and more than 319,000 California seniors saved $170 million in prescription drug costs.

Should some or the entire ACA be declared unconstitutional, the state will assess the court’s decision and determine how we can move forward to achieve the objectives of the ACA.  California is committed to building on our current efforts to create a strong foundation for healthcare reform in California.

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

We Can Rebuild You

A look back at how downtown Santa Cruz recovered from the 1989 earthquake

 

International Earth Day—Mother Earth Day

Every April 22, humanity celebrates International Mother Earth Day and Earth Day. As more than a billion people participate in Earth Day activities every year, Earth Day has become the world’s largest civic observance. The massive concern to build right relations between humanity and the living being we call Earth is evidence of humanity’s love of the Mother. In 2009, the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed April 22 International Mother Earth Day, with a significant resolution affirming “the interdependence existing among human beings, other living species (the kingdoms—mineral, plant, animal and human) and the planet itself, the Earth which we all inhabit.” The Earth is our home. Celebrating Earth Day helps us define new emerging processes (economic, social, political) focused on the well-being of the kingdoms. Through these, humanity seeks to raise the quality of life, foster equality and begin to establish right relations with the Earth. We dedicate ourselves to bringing forth balance and a relationship of harmony with all of nature. Learn about planting a billion trees (the Canopy Project); participate in 1.5 billion acts of green. Disassociation (toward Earth) is no longer viable. We lose our connection to life itself. Participation is viable—an anchor, refuge and service for all of life on Earth. Visit earthday.org; harmonywithnatureun.org; and un.org/en/events/motherearthday for more information. From Farmers Almanac, “On Earth Day, enjoy the tonic of fresh air, contact with the soil, companionship with nature! Go barefooted. Walk through woods, find wildflowers and green moss. Remain outside, no matter the weather!” Nature, Earth’s most balanced kingdom, heals us. The New Group of World Servers is preparing for the May 3 Wesak Buddha Taurus solar festival. We prepare through asking for and offering forgiveness. Forgiveness purifies and like nature, heals.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Mission Critical

How reading Lisa Jensen’s reviews taught me to love film
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Oral Fixations

Blown away by a Tuesday night dinner at Oswald

 

What would you like to see a TED talk about?

Hydrogen-gas cars that are coming this summer. Scott Oliver, Santa Cruz, Professor

 

Sarah’s Vineyard

Sarah’s Vineyard of Gilroy is known for crafting fine wines—and one of my all-time favorites is its Chardonnay. But this time, its Viognier has my vote.

 

Munch

East Coast meets West Coast in new meat lover’s paradise