Santa Cruz Good Times

Friday
Apr 18th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Supervisor Tony Campos

Why is it necessary to build a new levee for the Pajaro River? What has been your involvement with the 100-Year Flood Protection Project?

The 100-Year Flood Protection project is intended to correct a levee system built on the Pajaro River in 1949 that has been declared inadequate (and proven inadequate as evidenced by the floods of 1955, 1958, 1995, 1997, and 1998) in providing 100-year flood protection for the area.

As a member of the Santa Cruz County Board of Supervisors representing the Fourth District (South County), I am concerned by the property and economic damage another flood will bring to our community. The senior communities of Bay Village and Pajaro Village are adjacent to the levee—as is some of the most bountiful agricultural land in the country. To disregard the threat of another flood is irresponsible. I have participated in meetings with all stakeholders, including holding community meetings to ensure residents are informed of the status of this project. The safety of the residents is important to me.

I have traveled with other local officials to Sacramento to meet with California Department of Water Resources officials and with state legislators to garner support for our project and pursue state grant funding. In addition, we have traveled to Washington D.C. to meet with the United States Army Corps of Engineers (ACOE) officials and federal legislators to ensure our project is given adequate attention.

The ACOE is the federal sponsor for the levee project; the local sponsors are Monterey and Santa Cruz counties. The local sponsors, along with the City of Watsonville, provide the ACOE with a variety of local factual information and input to aid in the planning, design, and construction of an adequate levee project. Over the years, the ACOE has studied approximately 19 design project alternatives and is currently approaching a critical stage of designating one of the project alternatives a National Economic Development Project (NEDP) project.

I and other Santa Cruz County officials have been assertively negotiating with the ACOE and I have enlisted the help of federal legislators to ensure that the project design designated as the NED is also a Locally Preferred Project (LPP), one that has the local stakeholder consensus and adequately protects critical sections of Santa Cruz County. The project must provide 100-year flood protection to urban areas, protect rural water wells, and protect the prime farmland that serves as our community’s economic base.


What is your opinion of the current proposed plan?

The current draft plan for the project (the NED) would not provide any additional flooding protection; much less reach the goal of providing 100-year protection for critical sections of the Santa Cruz County Project area. In fact the Corps’ NED would actually make some of our areas more vulnerable to flooding by building 100-year protection levees on the Monterey County side of the river. In addition, there is the concern that the project levees will not be improved to new federal standards for such construction without protection on the Santa Cruz County side in certain sections of the river. The Corps’ NED would provide 100-year protection to very deserving communities in Monterey County, while leaving approximately 8-year protection for critical sections of Santa Cruz County. These actions are not only unacceptable to the local sponsors, but they fail to fulfill the goals of 100-year flood protection for both sponsors. The locally preferred project (LPP) would provide 100-year flood protection to the entire project area and is admittedly more expensive than the Corps’ presumed NED. However, any cost savings would be quickly lost when the all-but-certain 100-year flood event occurs and lays waste to our rich agricultural lands—resulting in soil contamination, job losses, potential public health hazards, and the exposure to continuous and expensive litigation for Santa Cruz County.

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Cardinal Grand Cross in the Sky

Following Holy Week (passion, death and burial of the Pisces World Teacher) and Easter Sunday (Resurrection Festival), from April 19 to the 23, the long-awaited and discussed Cardinal Cross of Change appears in the sky, composed of Cardinal signs Aries, Libra, Cancer, and Capricorn, with planets (13-14 degrees) Uranus (in Aries), Jupiter (in Cancer), Mars (in Libra) and Pluto (in Capricorn), an actual geometrical square or cross configuration. Cardinal signs mark the seasons of change, initiating new realities.

 

Sugar: The New Tobacco?

Proposed bill would require warning labels on sugary drinks Will soda and other saccharine libations soon come with a health warning? They will if it’s up to our state senator, Bill Monning (D-Carmel). On Feb. 27, Monning proposed first-of-its-kind legislation that would require a consumer warning label be placed on sugar-sweetened beverages sold in California. SB 1000, also known as the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Safety Warning Act, was proposed to provide vital information to consumers about the harmful effects of consuming sugary drinks, such as sodas, sports drinks, energy drinks, and sweetened teas.

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of April 17

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >

 

Growing Hope

Campos Seguros combats sexual assault in the Watsonville farmworker community Farm work was a way of life for Rocio Camargo, who grew up in Watsonville as the daughter of Mexican immigrants. Her parents met while working the fields 30 years ago, and her father went on to run Fuentes Berry Farms.
Sign up for Tomorrow's Good Times Today
Upcoming arts & events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Foodie File: Red Apple Cafe

Breakfast takes center stage at Gracia Krakauer's Red Apple Cafe Before they moved to Aptos, Gracia and her husband Dan Krakauer would visit friends in Santa Cruz County and eat at the Red Apple Café all the time. Then they moved up here from Santa Monica five years ago, and bought the Aptos location (there’s a separate one in Watsonville) from the family who owned it for two decades.

 

How would you feel about a tech industry boom in Santa Cruz?

I feel like it would ruin the small old-town feeling of Santa Cruz. It wouldn’t be the same Surf City kind of vacation town that it is. Antoinette BennettSanta Cruz | Construction Management

 

Trout Gulch Vineyards

Cinsault 2012—la grande plage diurne The most popular wines on store shelves are those most generally known and available—Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, which are all superb for sure. But when you come across a more unusual varietal, like Trout Gulch Vineyards’ Cinsault ($18), it opens up a whole new world.

 

Waddell Creek, Al Fresco

Route One Summer Farm Dinner You’ve been buying their insanely fresh produce for years now at farmers’ markets. Right? So now why not become more familiar with the gorgeous Waddell Creek farmlands of Route One Farms?