Santa Cruz Good Times

Wednesday
Jan 28th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Town Hall with Rep. Sam Farr

SamFarrNewWhat are you, and others in congress, doing to address the problematic backlog of claims at the Veterans Benefits Administration, which is keeping so many returned soldiers from accessing their benefits? 

When a soldier puts on their uniform, they make a promise to defend our country at all costs. In exchange, we make a promise that our nation will never forget their service and will provide them with the benefits they earned. Unfortunately, our country is failing to live up to that promise.

 The backlog at the Veterans Benefits Administration is nothing short of travesty. The inability to process claims in a timely manner has left our veterans without access to the benefits and healthcare they need.

As a member of the Appropriations subcommittee that handles veteran issues, I am working to end the VA backlog. We have provided the department with the funds necessary to implement a new Veterans Benefits Management System, an electronic processing system designed to end the backlog by 2015.

However, a new system is not enough; we also need to change the culture of the VA that exacerbated this problem. Earlier this year, I met with Secretary Eric Shinseki personally and told him to end the backlog. Shortly after that meeting, he announced that the department would expedite all claims over a year old. 

This is a step in the right direction but we must hold the VA’s feet to the fire. The FY 2014 Military Construction and Veterans Affairs Appropriations Bill passed last month included language requested by myself, Rep. Barbara Lee, Rep. Mike Thompson and other members of the California delegation that will do just that. This bill allows Congress to conduct additional oversight and requires regular updates from the department on the status of the backlog.

No veteran should have to wait for the benefits they earned. I plan to pursue every avenue possible until our country can once again say that we are living up to the promise we made to our veterans.

In light of the recent NSA leak, what are your thoughts about the mass-surveillance Prism program that was revealed?

The recent reports concerning the National Security Agency’s collection of customer data from the telecommunication companies are disturbing.  When the Patriot Act was first proposed in 2001, I was worried that it could be used to circumvent an individual’s privacy in the name of security. That is one of the reasons I voted against the legislation then and every time it was up for reauthorization since.

One of the things I find particularly troubling is the role of the FISA court in this program. The court is meant to be a check against the government’s power. Supporters of the Patriot Act told us that it would prevent violations of personal liberty. Yet every request made by the NSA under the PRISM program was approved by the FISA court. It cannot be a safeguard to our individual freedoms if the court is nothing more than a rubber stamp. 

As a nation, we need to use this controversy and the upcoming debate on the Intelligence Authorization Act, as an opportunity to reevaluate our methods of domestic surveillance. Instead of programs that infringe upon our rights, we need to develop programs that respect the privacy and civil liberties of American citizens.

National security should be one of the top priorities of any nation but we must weigh that against the foundations of our democracy. We should not abandon our freedoms in pursuit of safety. If we build too many walls to protect us, we may soon find ourselves living in a prison.

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Force of Nature

Santa Cruz’s Carlie Statsky brings her love of the natural world to the hyper-personal art of wedding photography

 

Mercury Retrograde in Aquarius

The magical time of Mercury’s retrograde cycle is here once again, until Feb. 11, and then some. The Mercury retro cycle actually lasts eight weeks when we consider its retrograde shadow, giving us six months a year for review. We know the rules of Mercury retro: Be careful with everything; cars, driving, money, resources, friends, friendships, groups, interactions, thinking, talking, communications. Avoid big purchases, important meetings and important repairs. Mercury retrograde times are for review, reassessment and rest. Our minds are overloaded from the last Mercury retro. Our minds need to assess what we’ve done since October—eliminating what is not needed, keeping what’s important, preparing for new information in the next three months (till mid-May). Mercury in Aquarius retrograde … we reinvent ourselves, seek the unusual, we don’t hide, we’re just careful. We live in two worlds; outer appearances and inner reckonings, with both sides of our brain activated. Yet, like the light of the Gemini twins, one light waxes (inner world), the other (outer realities) wanes. Like Virgo, we see what’s been overlooked—assessing, ordering and organizing information. It’s an entirely inner process. When speaking we may utter only half of the sentence. We’re in the underworld, closer to Spirit, eyes unseeing, senses alerted, re-doing things over and over till we sometimes collapse. Because we’re in other realms, we’re wobbly, make mistakes, and don’t really know what we want. It’s not a time for decisions. Not yet. It’s a time of review. And completing things. Mercury retro: integration, slowing down, resolution, rapprochement.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of January 23

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Bye Bye Benten!

Benten closing, plus Award-winning gin, a massive burrito and chocolate review

 

Trout Gulch Vineyards

Scanning the shelves of Deluxe Foods of Aptos, which carries an impressive selection of local and imported wines, I picked up a bottle of Trout Gulch Vineyards Chardonnay 2012, described as “a local favorite” by the busy market.

 

Cremer House

What’s old is cutting-edge again in Felton

 

How are you going to make a tangible difference in your community this year?

Spread more kindness and compassion.