Santa Cruz Good Times

Oct 03rd
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Assemblymember Mark Stone

Mark StoneLegislation you recently introduced would change the way mobile home owners can sell their homes. What is the purpose of this bill?

In the Monterey Bay Area and throughout our state, mobile homes offer an affordable avenue to home ownership for many buyers, especially for seniors and fixed-income families. In fact, more than 700,000 people live in California’s 4,734 mobile home parks. However, a mobile home owner whose home is located in a mobile home park does not own the land the unit sits on, and he or she must pay rent and fees for the land and any community spaces. In order to sell a mobile home located in a park, potential buyers must be approved by park management. Home owners trying to sell their home are therefore reliant on park management to approve the buyer so that the sale can be completed. Park management are not limited in the number of potential buyers they can reject, which places pressure on home owners to find a buyer that qualifies under the standards set in place by park management. Most standards are not set or regulated by the state and can vary widely from park to park. As a result, responsible and trustworthy potential buyers can be unfairly turned away.

Because of this problem, this month I introduced AB 2026, a bill that improves mobile home owners’ ability to sell their homes to an eligible buyer. The bill requires the purchaser of the mobile home to be presumed to have the ability to pay if he or she has been approved by a state or federally chartered financial institution for a loan to buy the mobile home. Park management must provide documentary evidence that the buyer has not complied with rules and regulations in a housing unit within the last three years in order to deny them on those grounds. A buyer cannot be denied solely because they own another mobile home or residence. AB 2026 also requires that management, upon request from a potential buyer, provide a list of information that will be used to decide eligibility for residency in the park. If the potential buyer is denied, management must provide them with the specific reason for their denial and, upon request, meet with the buyer to reconsider the denial based upon any additional information available at that time.

It’s important that we have protections in place to ensure that responsible and trustworthy home buyers can purchase these homes without being subject to overly restrictive standards put in place by park management.

You have also introduced a bill that would give ID cards to prison inmates. Why?

This month I also introduced legislation that requires state prison inmates to be issued current California identification cards upon release. This will assist men and women parolees in their transition to post-release life. Recently released parolees need a state-issued ID card to access critical social services such as CalFresh, housing assistance, and MediCal. Immediate access to MediCal is especially important for parolees who need medication to stay physically and mentally healthy, and the other services are necessary for individuals who need stability to ensure that they don’t become another recidivism statistic.

Under current law, in order to get a California ID card, parolees must go to a DMV office and show the DMV worker their prison identification as proof of who they are. This is a difficult process that unnecessarily burdens the parolee and reduces the likelihood that he or she will acquire the card and start receiving post-release services. By removing a bureaucratic hurdle for parolees, this measure could help reduce recidivism.

Comments (3)Add Comment
Community Property Manager
written by Long Term Industry Manager, April 16, 2014
I was shocked to read why the author of AB 2026 felt this legislation was necessary when there are already laws in place to protect prospective applicants and the sellers of mobile homes within a community. So much so, that the scales are already tipped in favor of the applicant. I am not sure where he is getting his information regarding so many applicants being denied, as in my 22 yrs. of managing I can honestly say, it rarely happens. And when it has, it is truly justified. The MRL Civil Code already has what is needed in place for qualifying, we do not need redundant laws such as this. It is apparent that the author is misinformed. It is currently so difficult to evict from a mobile home Community in our area that I feel it is safe to say that it is nearly impossible. After spending years with colleagues in the industry to uplift our image and assist the hardworking homeowners within these communities to feel proud of where they live and help the media of their ignorance who still use terms like "trailer park" and to educate people about the lifestyle a Manufactured Housing Community can provide; if AB 2026 is passed it will take us so far back in history instead of propelling into the future which is where Manufactured Housing Communities need to go.
former Fairoaks Mobilehome Lodge Association
written by Peggy, March 05, 2014
Most park owners do not care about mhome residents. How many residents tried to sell but couldn't because park owners prevented it ...raise your hand! Too many.
Our experienes was horrible and I would never live in a park again.
A mobilehome park owner
written by Parkowner, March 05, 2014
AB 2026 is completely unnecessary and demonstrates the author's lack of understanding of the mobilehome business. Why do you believe that because a "chartered" institution approves a borrower for a loan that this buyer will also be able to meet the additional monthly rent and utility obligations as well? Those can amount to over a thousand per month. Chartered lending institutions have failed to demonstrate prudent judgement in their lending practices. Have you forgotten the S&L bailout of 1989? And what about 700 billion dollar bailout of 2008? As a businessman, I welcome the opportunity to bring in new residents; However the cost of evicting bad apples is very high. I don't need more government regulation to tell me they can make this determination better then I. I like my plan; I'd like to keep it.

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