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Aug 31st
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SC Culture, Attractions, Art Galleries & Theater

visitsc_culture_HairsprayGet out and enjoy some Santa Cruz Attractions, Art Galleries & Theater.

Cabrillo Stage at the Cabrillo Theatre
6500 Soquel Drive, Aptos, 831-479-6154;
831-479-6429, cabrillostage.com. photo: rr jones

Art League Broadway Playhouse
526 Broadway, Santa Cruz, 831-426-5787, scal.org. Boasting an impressive art gallery as well as a small theater, the Art League Broadway Playhouse rocks audiences with thought-provoking shows.

Henry J. Mello Center
215 East Beach St., Watsonville. 831-763-4047, mellocenter.com. One of South County’s finest. The lavish setting has balcony seating, a luxurious stage and much more.

Jewel Theatre Company
1001 Center St., Santa Cruz 831-425-1003, http://www.jeweltheatre.net/. Founded in 2005 and featuring an 88-seat theatre. It’s the Santa Cruz playground for dramatic artists. New written works and local actors hit the stage in full-length productions and in short shows.

Louden Nelson Community Center
301 Center St., Santa Cruz, 831-420-6177 The famed local center often attracts quirky and diverse offerings on the theater front, but take note of its other offerings—everything from seniors yoga to dance. The hallway doubles as an art gallery.

Mountain Community Theatre
9400 Mill St., Ben Lomond, 831-336-4777, mctshows.org. A wide range of shows makes this local company stand out.

Rio Theatre
1205 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, 831-423-8209, riotheatre.com. A former movie palace turned multi-use performing arts venue attracting some of the biggest names in music, arts and literature.

Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium
307 Church St., Santa Cruz, 831-420-5240. One-time mega gymnasium has been re-imagined for great local outings and world class performances by global stars.

Santa Cruz Actor's Theatre
http://www.actorssc.org/. Founded in 1985, theatre group performs new, contemporary and classical plays. Annual performances held at Center Stage in Santa Cruz.

Art Galleries

Artisans Gallery
1368 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, 831-423-8183, artisanssantacruz.com. This showcase for local talent offers a slice of everything, from woodwork and ceramics to jewelry, prints and glass art.

Felix Kulpa
107 Elm St., Santa Cruz, 408-373-2854, felixkulpa.com. Specializing in offbeat, never pretentious, contemporary art. Art shows change on a regular basis.

Made in Santa Cruz
57 Santa Cruz Municipal Wharf, 831-426-2257, madeinsantacruz.com. Expect a large selection of original paintings, blown glass, ceramics and sculpture from local artists here.

Mary Porter Sesnon Art Gallery
Porter College, UC Santa Cruz, 831-459-3606.  An amazingly wide variety of art covering all genres decorates this hidden treasure at the City on a Hill.

MichaelAngelo Studios
1111 River St., Santa Cruz, 831-426-5500. http://michaelangelogallery.wordpress.com.  Once an old tanning house, the historic building was about to be demolished when a local sculptor stepped in and converted it into a gallery and maze of studios for local artists. Now it offers everything from art openings to fundraisers.

Motion Pacific Dance
131 Front St, Santa Cruz, 831-476-1616. www.motionpacific.com. Truly a unique spot. From its high ceilings and open space, this local dance studio has everything. Take note of the great dance company here and the events that take place.

Museum of Art & History
705 Front St., Santa Cruz, 831-429-1964, santacruzmah.org. Downtown’s impressive art haven has an extensive array of art, many from locals. The great thing about MAH is that it has a big-city feel.

Santa Cruz Art League
526 Broadway, Santa Cruz, 831-426-5787, scal.org. One of the area’s most revered portals for art, SCAL showcases the county’s finest works. This charming creative hub is a hotbed of activity in October, too, when the annual Open Studios tour is under way, but check this spot out year-round.

Shen’s Gallery
2404 Mission St., Santa Cruz 831-457-4422, antiquesforliving.com. The large Mission Street showroom offers a huge selection of Chinese antiques not easily found anywhere else. Local delivery and world-wide shipping available.

Attractions

Agricultural History Project Museum
2601 East Lake Ave., Watsonville, 831-724-5898, aghistoryproject.org. See antique farm machinery and get a sense of how they used to do it in the good old days. The Central Coast is internationally known for its farming and this museum has some of the best collections.

Capitola Historical Museum
410 Capitola Ave., Capitola, 831-464-0322, capitolamuseum.org. The charming village by the sea and its museum are often called quaint. With photographs and artifacts dating back to the days of Camp Capitola, the museum is lovingly curated.

Roaring Camp Railroads
Graham Hill Road, Felton, 831-335-4484, roaringcamp.com. Riding on the railroad will take you back in time into the redwood forest ending at the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk, a historical point of interest in its own right.

San Lorenzo Valley Historical Museum
12547 Highway 9, Boulder Creek 831-338-8382, slvmuseum.com. The San Lorenzo Valley is rich in historical interests and this museum covers it all, from life-size dioramas depicting pioneer life, to the tools they carried.

Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk
400 Beach St., Santa Cruz, 831-423-5590, www.beachboardwalk.com. Who on this Earth would not enjoy an afternoon or evening of thrilling rides, carnival games and amazing food? Not to mention the awesome view and location, next to the Municipal Wharf and close to the Boardwalk Bowl.Surfer_tube

Santa Cruz Mission State Historic Park
144 School St., Santa Cruz, 831-429-2850, www.parks.ca.gov. One of the historic missions built in California during the 1800s, the Mission La Exaltacíon de la Santa Cruz is where the town gets its name—Holy Cross.

Santa Cruz Museum of Natural History
1305 East Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz, 831-420-6115, santacruzmuseum.org. Simply one of the easiest museums to find because of the life-size concrete gray whale resting out front.

Santa Cruz Mystery Spot
465 Mystery Spot Road, Santa Cruz, 831-423-8897, mysteryspot.com. The Mystery Spot is open 365 days a year, so it’s always a great time to satisfy your curiosity.

Santa Cruz Surfing Museum and Mark Abbott Memorial Lighthouse
701 West Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz 831-420-6289, santacruzsurfingmuseum.org. Besides being inside one of the most recognizable Santa Cruz icons, the museum is perched above one of the world’s premier surf spots, Steamer Lane, where you can see some of the best in surfing.

Seymour Marine Discovery Center at Long Marine Lab
100 Shaffer Road, Santa Cruz, 831-459-3800, seymourcenter.ucsc.edu. The Seymour Center is a destination that will leave you with the abysmal regret that you didn’t pursue a marine biology degree.

Wilder Ranch State Park
1401 Coast Road, Santa Cruz, Highway 1 just past Swift Street 408-423-9703, www.parks.ca.gov. Wilder Ranch was one of the bigger ranches, and though most of the cows have left for greener pastures the 100-plus year-old ranch survives intact complete with old barns, wagons and farming paraphernalia. A great place to hike along the tall cliffs you’ve been enviously watching from the car window on the Pacific Coast.


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