Santa Cruz Good Times

Friday
Feb 12th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Color Bind

film_skin2White parents, black child-chaos, in affecting 'Skin'

Despite its title, the persuasive drama, Skin, is not about race. At least, it's not about race alone. Yes, the plot revolves around the true story of a black South African girl born to white parents during the shameful and divisive apartheid era. But on a larger scale, the issues of identity, otherness and separatism explored here could just as easily apply to a story about national, sexual, political, or religious intolerance, as well as racism—any of the artificial barriers that divide us from our fellow humans. Where Skin gains power is in showing how the effects of injustice can be just as devastating on those who wield it as on those it's wielded against.

The feature debut of director Anthony Fabian (who gets a story credit alongside screenwriters Helen Crawley, Jessie Keyt, and Helena Kriel), Skin dramatizes the true story of Sandra Laing. Played in the film as a child by newcomer Ella Ramangwane, Sandra is a bright, eager girl with a toffee-colored complexion and black, corkscrew curls, even though her parents, Pa (Sam Neill) and Ma (Alice Krige) are white Afrikaners, whose forebears were Dutch colonists. Her parents, who own a provincial post office and dry goods store, love their daughter without reservation, and while Sandra plays with the black children of her parents' employees, she identifies as white—right down to her favorite blonde-haired doll.

But in 1965, when 10-year-old Sandra is sent to her first boarding school, she's surprised that everyone thinks she's black. Her presence is so "disruptive" in the strictly segregated school, she's finally sent home (after a brutal caning for no reason in front of her class). Even more humiliating is the legal campaign her father launches to have her officially "classified" as white (including such scientific methods as testing to see if her hair is kinky enough to support a pencil). While a geneticist causes a mild uproar in court by testifying that virtually all white Dutch Afrikaners possess enough recessive black genes in the bloodline to produce a "colored" child, it's not until a law is passed designating racial classification according to parentage that Sandra becomes legally "white’ again.

Evolving from a carefree child into a shy, wary 18-year-old, Sandra (now played by the luminous Sophie Okonedo) resists her parents' attempts to set her up with a series of white Afrikaner boys who insult (or assault) her without a second thought. Instead, she falls in love with charismatic black vegetable gardener, Petrus (Tony Kgoroge), from a nearby shantytown. Not only is their relationship illegal (because she's "white"), it causes an irredeemable rupture with her volatile Pa that tears her family apart.

Sandra's odyssey to find a place where she belongs is heartrending, as she endures the stereotypes that society (and her own loved ones) continually project onto her. Her relationship with her father is the film's most complex; he genuinely loves her and encourages her with his motto, "Never give up." But while he's determined to fight for her rights, his own identity is so wrapped up in defending his masculinity (against the occasional insulting suggestion that he's not really Sandra's father), and his own privileged whiteness, he finally doesn't care how much suffering he inflicts on Sandra to prove them. Potential tragedy also haunts her relationship with Petrus, whom she can neither legally wed, nor shield from the dehumanizing effects of racism and poverty.

The film occasionally strays into an all-purpose Men-Are-Pigs philosophy, its women constantly manipulated and terrorized by the males in their lives. But film_skinoverall, with its fine performances and subdued intensity, Skin will resonate with anyone who has ever felt like an outsider for reasons entirely beyond his or her control, and who's had cause to know first-hand that separate is never equal.

SKIN ★★★ (out of four)

With Sophie Okonedo, Sam Neill, and Alice Krige. Written by Helen Crawley, Jessie Keyt, and Helena Kriel. Directed by Anthony Fabian. A Jour de Fete release. Rated PG-13. 107 minutes.

Watch movie trailer >>>

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Heart Me Up

In defense of Valentine’s Day

 

“be(ing) of love (a little) more careful”—e.e. cummings

Wednesday (Feb. 10) is Ash Wednesday, when Lent begins. Friday (Feb. 12) is Lincoln’s 207th birthday. Sunday is Valentine’s Day. On Ash Wednesday, with foreheads marked with a cross of ashes, we hear the words, “From dust thou art and unto dust thou shalt return.” Reminding us that our bodies, made of matter, will remain here on Earth when we are called back. It is our Soul that will take us home again. Lent offers us 40 days and nights of purification in preparation for the Resurrection (Easter) festival (an initiation) and for the Three Spring Festivals (at the time of the full moon)—Aries, Taurus, Gemini. The New Group of World Servers have been preparing since Winter Solstice. The number 40 is significant. The Christ (Pisces World Teacher) was in the desert for 40 days and 40 nights prior to His three-year ministry. The purpose of this desert exile was to prepare his Archangel (light) body to withstand the pressures of the Earth plane (form and matter). We, too, in our intentional purifications and prayers during the 40 days of Lent, prepare ourselves (physical body, emotions, lower mind) to receive and be able to withstand the irradiation of will, love/wisdom and light streaming into the Earth at spring equinox, Easter, and the Three Spiritual Festivals. What is Lent? The Anglo-Saxon word, lencten, comes from an ancient spring festival, agricultural rites marking the transition between winter and summer. The seasons reflect changes in nature (physical world) and humanity responds with social festivals of gratitude and of renewal. There is a purification process, prayerfulness in nature and in humanity in preparation for a great flow of spiritual energies during springtime. Valentine’s Day: Aquarius Sun, Taurus moon. Let us offer gifts of comfort, ease, harmony, beauty and satisfaction. Things chocolate and golden. Venus and Taurus things.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of February 12

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Pub Watch

Mega gastro pub-in-progress at the Old Sash Mill, plus the best pasta dish downtown

 

How do you know love is real?

When you feel the groove in your heart and you’re inspired to dance. Becca Bing, Boulder Creek, Teacher

 

Temple of Umami

Watsonville’s Miyuki is homestyle cooking, Japanese-style

 

How would you stop people from littering?

Teach them from the time that they’re small that it’s not an appropriate behavior. Juliet Jones, Santa Cruz, Claims Adjuster