Santa Cruz Good Times

Thursday
Aug 27th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Herbal Outfitters

ae_high_herbQuirky new downtown shop dispenses natural highs
Only a longtime resident of this town can fully grasp the meaning of the slogan “Keep Santa Cruz Weird.” There was a time when the Pacific Garden Mall teemed with eccentric characters, bohemian shops and offbeat events. For every Average Joe, there was an unusual street performer, a hippie harlequin wielding devil sticks or a flamboyant hipster in A Clockwork Orange-like apparel.

Santa Cruz’s quirk factor has taken a significant plunge in the past decade or so, but lately there have been some encouraging signs that our town is getting its weird back. One example is the pair of gentlemen whom your narrator recently saw reclining on the lawn of the Capitola New Leaf in sleeping bags. Another is an unambiguously psychedelic shop on Pacific Avenue called Truthlab, which proclaims itself an “antidote to the ordinary.”

And then, of course, there’s the new Happy High Herbs Shop (227 Cathcart St., Santa Cruz; 469-4372;   happyhighherbs.com) right next to Hula’s Island Grill. The cheerful, flowery logo above the building’s entrance is a tip-off to the store’s unorthodox nature. Venture inside, and you’ll find a wide array of herbal concoctions designed to make you mellow, energized, horny, healthy, happy and—yes—high. Various Happy High products are said to approximate the effects of Ecstasy, Viagra and even speed.

Cynthia Nelson, co-owner of the shop, says business has been booming so far. “I can’t tell you how happy I am if it stays this way,” she enthuses. “The success is off the chart. People have come in and have started purchasing every day. I would say a third of our business is repeat already in one month.”

ae_high_herb1An affable fellow named Ray Thorpe founded Happy High Herbs 15 years ago in his native Nimbin, a hippie area in the Australian state of New South Wales. Since then, the business has expanded to include 24 different shops in Australia as well as four in America. (Along with the Santa Cruz store, there are Happy High shops in Berkeley, San Diego and Tempe, Ariz.) In addition to their all-natural mood enhancers, the stores offer such items as essential oils, natural cosmetics and Burning Man-friendly toys.

When Thorpe greets me shortly before the Grand Opening of the Santa Cruz shop, he’s decked out in the space-age-tribal attire that is the fashion of modern psychedelia. His Hare Krishna-esque hairdo (shaven in the front, a gray tuft in the back) matches that of his partner Elizabeth Rix.

Easing into a chair, the muscular shop owner explains that while natural herbs are available at health food stores, his stores are unique in that they offer herbs to counter addictions to chemical drugs both legal and illegal. As opposed to a pharmacy or a doctor’s office, Happy High is a place where people can come and talk human-being-to-human-being about their problems or addictions.

Thorpe recounts a particularly dramatic moment at his store in Ocean Beach, where a customer told him that one of Happy High’s products, a Southeast Asian medicinal leaf called Kratom, had helped him get off heroin. “This is not public knowledge, because people generally say that nothing can get you off heroin,” the shop owner notes, adding that Kratom can also help cure speed addiction.

Similarly, passion flower can be used to help people quit smoking cigarettes, and Happy High’s keystone herb, Damiana, serves as an alternative not only to marijuana, but also to Prozac: According to Thorpe, it can be used as a cure for mild depression. “The biggest disease in modern society is depression, and it’s actually linked to the kidneys,” he states. He explains that unlike pharmaceutical antidepressants, Damiana is a kidney tonic. “I really feel that offering a chemical drug for depression is missing the point, because even the chemical drugs are polluting our kidneys.”

ae_high_herb2Thorpe, who says he himself quit smoking pot with the aid of Damiana, admits that most of Happy High’s herbs are not as potent as the drugs of addiction that they aim to replace. They will, however, relax the user and help him or her get through the period of withdrawal. “Likewise, the party herbs that we’ve got won’t be as strong as Ecstasy and all that,” he notes. “If they were, they’d probably be banned. But they’re good enough to have a good time without looking for an illegal drug.”

GT decides to put that statement to the test by trying out a Happy High party elixir called Cherry Pop, whose ingredients include Guarana, citrus extract, Pelargonium quercifolium, chocolate extract and 50 mg of caffeine. Thorpe has warned me that it’s not the tastiest stuff, and darned if he isn’t right. (Think cough medicine.) But hoo-wee! Yes indeedy, friends, it really works. There’s a warm bodily hum, a pleasant tingly headed sensation and a feeling of being elated yet calm. I also seem to find myself a wee bit rubber-legged. It’s perfect fuel for a night of dancing and partying. All told, I’m happily high for four hours or so. I’m slightly grouchy on the comedown, and my stomach is mildly upset, but the negatives are minor compared to the aftermath of alcohol or various other well-known recreational substances.

Well, I can thoroughly vouch for the efficacy of at least one Happy High party product. But is this stuff safe? Though you’ll find some online chat forum posts from customers who report feeling ill after ingesting these herbs, Thorpe claims that none of Happy High’s products are harmful whatsoever, even in overdose. He acquiesces that when combined with alcohol, some of his party herbs can make their users feel queasy. “But it’s the alcohol that’s the problem. And we warn people about that.”

Nonetheless, in 2009, the Australian Crime Commission conducted a simultaneous raid of all 20 Happy High shops that existed at the time. Thorpe discusses the raid in an online video:  youtube.com/watch?v=CWFyFfxoW00.

In Thorpe’s view, herbal pharmacology presents a threat to the pharmaceutical companies’ profit-oriented agenda: Rather than purchasing a large quantity of high-priced pills, a customer can buy a $10 packet of herbs at Happy High that will last three to six months. “I think we’re supposed to have been here for 40,000 years,” Thorpe states. “Only in the last 100 or 200 years has the pharmaceutical industry become involved in our health. And more than ever, our society has sickened.”

The entrepreneur adds that several potentially beneficial herbs are currently restricted. “For instance, Ephedra, which grows here in America, is restricted in most states and restricted mostly around the world, except in China. It’s the best thing ever for asthma, sinus and hay fever, and yet it’s not available. Our point is that herbalists should be able to prescribe Ephedra, but they’re not able to.”

Elizabeth Rix chimes in: “Our ancestors who got us here didn’t just walk into a K-Mart or a Wal-Mart. We didn’t get here because of the pharmaceutical companies or supermarkets. Our ancestors got us here by browsing in nature. There’s a place for doctors, hospitals and pharmaceuticals, but we also need to be able to choose if we want to go and get a natural product. There are hundreds of herbs that are often more powerful [than their pharmaceutical counterparts]. We’d like to bring people’s awareness ’round to them.”

Comments (8)Add Comment
Congratulations!!
written by Lisa B., March 03, 2011
Wow! Congratulations!! The store looks amazing and I can't wait to check out your products! I am so excited to have healthy, alternative ways to have a little relaxing fun!! I will be forwarding this article to my friends in San Francisco and I will be putting the word out after my visit next week!!
Cheers, your newest Happy High Herbal fan!! Lisa B
...
written by Torrey, March 01, 2011
I used to make tea from ephedra twigs for sinusitis - it brewed to a lovely red color and was quite effective as a decongestant. Not terribly stimulating, more like a feeling of mental clarity. Its a shame you can't get it anymore. I liked sassafras tea, too, and now that's also banned - probably because you can extract the base material from it for making MDMA. How many plants are they going to make illegal anyways? Just ridiculous.
...
written by Mystic, February 28, 2011
I haven't ventured there yet so thanks for the article & info. I will most definitely check it out the next time I'm in town! Congratulations! I agree with Moo! Very lucky indeed! Peace. ~M~ ~~)
Sorry, but here's more
written by Don, February 27, 2011
From Wikipedia,

"Ephedra may also be used as a precursor in the illicit manufacture of methamphetamine.[21]"

Cited from,

Barker W, Antia U (2007). "A study of the use of Ephedra in the manufacture of methamphetamine". Forensic Sci Int 166 (2-3): 102–9. doi:10.1016/j.forsciint.2006.04.005. PMID 16707238.
...
written by Moo, February 23, 2011
Congrats to the Happy High Herb Shop! I have been a HHH customer in Australia for 18 years! Ray Thorpe is truly a visionary. Santa Cruz, you are so lucky to have this shop in your neighborhood! Let's support this new local business folks, and get in there and enjoy the ambience and fun! Go Happy High Herbs, thanks for continuing to grow and prosper!
Just a note
written by LOoking On , February 23, 2011
Ephedra, an extract of the plant Ephedra sinica,[1] has been used as a herbal remedy in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of asthma and hay fever, as well as for the common cold

Ephedrine (not to be confused with ephedrone) is a sympathomimetic amine commonly used as a stimulant, appetite suppressant, concentration aid, decongestant, and to treat hypotension associated with anaesthesia.

Ephedrine is similar in structure to the (semi-synthetic) derivatives amphetamine and methamphetamine. Chemically, it is an alkaloid derived from various plants in the genus Ephedra (family Ephedraceae). It works mainly by increasing the activity of noradrenaline on adrenergic receptors.[1] It is most usually marketed in the hydrochloride and sulfate forms. This is why wikipedia is and was created ... also ... i think this is a wonderful article and thank you for the outline.

This is why they created Wikipedia ... Ephedra is used to make ephedrine so yes she is right ... but it should also be available for people to take for colds and so forth ...
...
written by jeffw, February 23, 2011
I think Anny is confused, the chemical Ephedrine used to make meth is not the same as the herb ephedra.
Finish your sentence...
written by Anny, February 23, 2011
Ephedra is one of the main ingredients in making Meth. That is why all shelf cold remedies with this ingredient have been eliminated in regular stores. Maybe this is why "herbalists" are not able to prescribe it.

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

The Meaning of ‘LIFE’

With a new documentary film about his work, and huge exhibits on both coasts, acclaimed Santa Cruz nature photographer Frans Lanting is having a landmark year. But his crusade for conservation doesn’t leave much time for looking back

 

Seasons of Opportunity

Everything in our world has a specific time (a season) in which to accomplish a specific work—a “season” that begins (opportunity) and ends (time’s up). I can feel the season is changing. The leaves turning colors, the air cooler, sunbeams casting shadows in different places. It feels like a seasonal change has begun in the northern hemisphere. Christmas is in four months, and 2015 is swiftly speeding by. Soon it will be autumn and time for the many Festivals of Light. Each season offers new opportunities. Then the season ends and new seasons take its place. Humanity, too, is given “seasons” of opportunity. We are in one of those opportunities now, to bring something new (Uranus) into our world, especially in the United States. Times of opportunity can be seen in the astrology chart. In the U.S. chart, Uranus (change) joins Chiron (wound/healing). This symbolizes a need to heal the wounds of humanity. Uranus offers new archetypes, new ways of doing things. The Uranus/Chiron (Aries/Pisces) message is, “The people of the U.S. are suffering. New actions are needed to bring healing and well-being to humanity. So the U.S. can fulfill its spiritual task of standing within the light and leading humanity within and toward the light.” Thursday, Aquarius Moon, Mercury enters Libra. The message, “To bring forth the new order in the world, begin with acts of Goodwill.” Goodwill produces right relations with everyone and everything. The result is a world of progressive well-being and peacefulness (which is neither passive nor the opposite of war). Saturday is the full moon, the solar light of Virgo streaming into the Earth. Our waiting now begins, for the birth of new light at winter solstice. The mother (hiding the light of the soul, the holy child), identifying the feminine principle, says, “I am the mother and the child. I, God (Father), I Matter (Mother), We are One.”

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

His Dinner With David

Author + reporter = brainy talk in ‘End of the Tour’
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Land of Plenty

Farm to Fork benefit dinner for UCSC’s Agroecology Center, plus a zippy salsa from Teresa’s Salsa that loves every food it meets

 

If you knew you had one week to live, what would you do?

Make peace with myself, which would allow me to be at peace with others. Diane Fisher, Santa Cruz, Network Engineer

 

Comanche Cellars

Michael Simons, owner and winemaker of Comanche Cellars, once had a trusted steed called Comanche, which was part of his paper route and his rodeo circuit, from the tender age of 10. In memory of this beautiful horse, he named his winery Comanche, and Comanche’s shoes grace the label of each handcrafted bottle.

 

Cantine Winepub

Aptos wine and tapas spot keeps it casual